Your Job Description Is Scaring Away Candidates. Here’s How To Fix It

Your Job Description Is Scaring Away Candidates. Here's How To Fix It

As a recruiter, I spend considerable time reviewing different job descriptions for a variety of mining and heavy industrial related positions. They are usually 1-3 page documents outlining job duties, key responsibilities, and requirements, giving an in-depth explanation of what is to be expected for the position. But even the “best” job descriptions are scaring away candidates. Either they are too long, too confusing, or not exciting enough. Here are a couple tricks I’ve learned to get the most out of your job description and start attracting the best candidates.

1. Keep it brief. In today’s world, people have a lot going on. The best candidates are still employed while they are searching for their next role. On top of that, they have families, social lives, and hobbies that are all competing for their time. They do not want to invest what little spare time they have on trying to decipher your multi-page job description. Remove any unnecessary information or industry standards to keep your job description concise. Things like “communication skills,” “Microsoft Office experience,” and “organization” are a waste of space and your candidate’s time.

2. Share specifics. Some job descriptions are incredibly generic and don’t give too many details about this specific job and how it’s unique within your company. Through experience and research, you can begin to learn what specifics the job generally requires. For instance, when I get a job order for a Reliability Engineer and the job descriptions says, “must have bachelor’s degree,” through experience I know they are generally looking for an engineering degree usually in mechanical or industrial with hands-on experience and preventative maintenance experience. This goes for all job orders, you must know your industry and understand the candidates that you are trying to attract in order to effectively recruit on positions.

3. Add personality. Culture fit is becoming more and more important in today’s world of recruiting. Candidates want to understand how they will fit in with your team, and what the company’s mission and visions are for the future. Take a paragraph in your job description to describe the team makeup and the company. Do you have casual Fridays? Monthly team happy hour? Does everyone get really into March Madness? I’m sure your organization is a great place to work, just make sure to let candidates know that right off the bat!