Why Recruiters Ask You Important Questions

Important questions recruiters ask

I work with recruiters everyday. I hear dozens of stories about successes and even some of failures. There’s one thing that unites them all, however, and that’s what you hear in the recruiter’s voice. I always hear care and passion behind all of the stories. The best part is that it’s 100% genuine.

I decided to dig deeper and ask them what the most important question they asked their candidates. For some it was a breeze – they knew right of the top of their head. But for others it was tougher – they love all of the questions they ask their candidates.

“What has you on the job market?”

This one comes from Ken, and it is one of the first things he asks. It’s so important because it helps him find the candidate the best fit. It also helps set the building blocks for a strong relationship between him and his client.

“Do I have your permission to represent you?”

This seemingly straight-forward question is Jeremy’s most important. It’s so simple, but it’s so necessary. As soon as the candidate says “yes,” Jeremey will give you the best chance possible to get the job.

“Where do you see your career going?”

This one comes from Dana, and it’s a gem. Dana isn’t being snoopy, she’s just genuinely interested. She has a few roles that need to be filled, and she wants to make sure that the candidate’s long-term goals line up with the client’s long-term goals as well.

“Can you relocate?”

Relocation is one of the biggest factors when switching jobs, and Alex wants to make sure the candidate is serious about the position. If it requires them to move to a new state, he wants to make sure they can and will move elsewhere.

“If you like this opportunity would you accept it?”

This comes from Tracy, and he means business. There’s no use wasting the candidate’s time if they won’t accept the opportunity. At the end of the day, honesty is the best policy.

“What do you like the most and the least about your current job?”

James wants to know what his candidates consider pros and cons of their current job. If he can align current pros to future pros and ensure current cons won’t become future cons at the new position, then he’ll be all in for the candidate.

“What is your motivation for a new job?”

Meredith wants to know the meat and potatoes behind the candidate. Do you want to get up and move? Are you tired of working at the same place? This question’s purpose is not only to get to know the candidate better, but to also get a glimpse of their outlook.

“Are you willing to work in contract?”

Ric wants to know if the candidate is willing to take a contract position. It could be only a few months, but it could also turn out to be a permanent hire. Ric just wants to know what it is the candidate is looking for in the future.

“Why are you looking for a change?”

Theresa sees it how it is, and wants to be on the same page as the candidate. She wants to know the candidate’s successes and struggles. This way, she can help lead them in the right direction.

“What’re you looking for in a workplace? Your fit? Passion? Teamwork?”

Dallas is diving even deeper with this question. What does the ideal workplace look like? Dallas wants to know everything the candidate is looking for at their next location. That way he can find the candidate their best fit.

“Why are you looking for a new job?”

This seemingly simple question comes from Tracey. The way the candidate answers the question will allow her to see what kind of work they’ve done in the past, as well as what kind of employee they are.

“Will this location work for you?” 

This comes from Krista, and she’s just trying to get to the point. She’s got a position open and she’s looking for the best candidate possible. She needs to know that this location is something you can manage so she can keep the process rolling.

“What does a new opportunity look like for you? Money? Availability? Location?”

Mike wants to match the candidate’s needs with what the client is offering. Are they on the same page or are they completely different? He wants to make sure that the client and candidate both maximize this opportunity for the long-term.

Nothing too fancy and nothing too scary, right? When recruiters constantly ask candidates questions it’s not just for fun. They’re trying to build a relationship so that they can help the candidate get a position that suits them, all while giving the client the most awesome candidate on the market. The next time you get contacted by a recruiter just remember: honesty is the best policy!