5 Factors to Consider When Faced With Multiple Job Offers

job offers

It happens a lot. You get recruited for a job through LinkedIn, and then another one. Now that you’re in the mindset you apply to a few jobs that interest you. There’s no way that you’ll actually get multiple offers, right?

Then, once you’ve interviewed with a few different companies, all of a sudden multiple offers start coming your way. It’s as if your inbox is raining offers and you can’t find an umbrella. What do you do? How do you decide? As you consider the options, stress starts to creep in. I mean, after all, it is your career, and you don’t want to make the wrong decision.

The stress lies in the decision. Whether it’s a choice between two jobs or ten, it’s important that you consider all of the factors and implications that come with each choice. As a senior in college looking to start a career in the summer, I currently find myself in this situation. And trust me when I say it’s a fun ride.

As I receive these offers, it’s tough to figure out how to decide on which offer to accept. Do I go with the higher salary but longer hours? What about the job with great benefits and an excellent work-life balance? As time winds down, I rank each job on a few different qualities so that I know exactly what I’m getting with all of them. It’s a great way to make the best decision that you really want to make.

Location

This one isn’t necessarily the most important one, but it is still a huge factor in deciding what offer to accept. If you legitimately don’t care what city you work in, then this won’t be a factor at all. However, an office in downtown will have different implications than one in a suburban or industrial area. It’s important to decide where you’d like to work so that you don’t regret the commute to work each day.

Office Culture

Hopefully, in your interview process, you get to meet the people you’ll be working with. In just a few minutes, you’ll get a good understanding of what kind of people they are and how you’ll be able to work with them. Whether it’s a culture that you’re on the fence about or one that you know you’ll thrive in, office culture is something that cannot be overlooked when making a career decision.

Training/Mentorship

This one is huge for me. If I’m starting a completely new career, then I want to start with a company that will allow me to learn the most. I want a place where I can go and soak up loads of information about the company and the most successful way for me to do my job. Whether it’s learning by doing right away or a classroom style training for a few months, I want to be sure I can learn as much as possible.

Growth Potential

You don’t want to be in a position that offers no room for growth. You want to work at a company where growth is expected from each employee because that way you know you’ll be set up for success. If you don’t have anything to work towards then the new start may lose its pizazz really quickly.

Money

This is another huge factor that goes into making a decision, and it goes deeper than just wages. You want to make sure that you’re not being undervalued as a new employee, so make sure you know what you’re worth. Wages and benefits need to play a factor in a position so that you know you’re not losing any money.

It’s also important to keep in mind the expenses side of the money equation. Before you accept any position, you need to consider relocation expenses and see if any company will help you with it. Next, you need to make sure that your yearly wages exceed your yearly expenses. I personally lay out my potential wages and expenses for each position on a spreadsheet. This makes it easy for me to see my after-tax savings I’ll be able to earn with each position.

Deciding on a job is no easy task, and at certain times in your life, different factors will be more important to you than others. At the end of the day, your heart will tell you where you want to go. And after weighing these different factors you’ll know exactly where that is.