Laid Off – Now What?

laid off

A large percentage of us will experience being laid off from a position in our lifetime. We never want to think about it, but it does happen. I, personally, have experienced four such events during my career and each return into the job market has held a different experience. I will not lie and say it got easier with “practice.” With Millennials on the heels of the Baby Boomers as being the largest living adult generation, there is fierce competition for available jobs.

According to Pew Research, 71 million adult Millennials and 74 million Boomers were registered in 2016. With 2019 being the anticipated break out year, Millennials should surpass the Boomer generation – reaching 73 million – with Boomers declining to 72 million.

The Dreaded Day

You show up for work like any other day and at some point throughout the day, you are notified that your services are no longer needed. Now what? You are most likely going to immediately experience shock and will go into autopilot as you reluctantly leave the premises. Here is what you may experience once you get home. Some take a few days to work through it and others get through it quickly. Everyone is different, but just remember to take the time to understand, acknowledge, and process what you are going through.

The Five Stages of Grief

  • Denial and Isolation
  • Anger
  • Bargaining
  • Depression
  • Acceptance

Once you reach the acceptance stage, you are ready to tackle the job market. The two biggest hurdles of the stages are avoiding putting yourself into isolation and falling into a depression that stymies you getting back into the workforce.

Remember this

You are not alone! LinkedIn is an incredible platform to keep you connected and in charge of your destiny. A good LinkedIn page will get you noticed by recruiters! Make sure you take the time to create a professional and completed profile!

  • Network, network, network! Don’t be ashamed – get the word out – you are on the market, and ready for the next chapter in your life.
  • Update that resume. Resumes are your first interview. Remember to list all your experience, skills, certifications, and degrees. Don’t go into that first interview underdressed!
  • Look at job openings and sign up for job alerts.
  • Update all of your social media sites! If your Facebook profile is a memory lane of a wild Vegas weekend, beer bongs, and crazy nights, you might want to swap it out to something more job search friendly.
  • Avoid dating yourself. You do not need to put the year you graduated high school or college on your resume.  There is debate as to how far back you should go with your career history, but remember this: could you be leaving off vital work experience by only going back 10 years? I personally like to see 15 to 25 years’ experience, where applicable.
  • Above all else, believe in yourself!

Losing a job is extremely stressful and can be life-changing. These are some steps to help you get back into the workforce and on track. It’s okay to have a small pity party, but don’t extend it into a recurring event that overcomes you. Take charge of your life and future. Reinvent yourself if you need to and remember: sometimes a step back will get you five steps ahead.

Pride, ego, and stubbornness are not friends in your job search. Believe in yourself, be humble, take your experience, talent and great attitude and make it happen – I know you can!

If you’re in this unfortunate situation right now, let’s connect! My team and I may be able to help you find your next career move and get you back to work.