Keeping Rural Heath Alive

Rural Health

When looking at rural health, there is no denying our rural hospitals are suffering. Every day, articles are being posted online on the effects of rural healthcare facilities closing and their communities. But what about all the medical needs of all the farmers, cattle ranchers, and other rural residents? Where are the people looking for peaceful quiet places and fresh air?

They’re leaving in herds

More and more people are moving out of rural areas. As a healthcare recruiter in Kansas, this is my number one selling point to my candidates: Living in a community where everybody knows your name. How nice is it to call Susie down the street to pick up your kids from school if your day has simply gotten away from you? I even know of communities that bus the kids around for free to activities and daycare while their parents work. Isn’t that what we are supposed to be doing as humans? Forming communities, being active within them, and lending a hand? 

I recently read an article where a wife lost her husband. He had fallen, and due to the recent closure of their nearest hospital in Kansas, air Ambulances couldn’t retrieve him. So, he was forced to be driven by an ambulance 90 miles to the nearest neurology center where he sadly succumbed to his fall. The medical and emotional consequences just don’t seem right.

However, living rural is glorious. I would say that over 80 percent of the candidates I talk to are thrilled to move to a place that makes them feel part of a community. It’s honestly the easiest selling point. Rural areas are where friends can meet for coffee before work, have neighborhood BBQs, watch your kids freely ride their bikes, and enjoy a fresh breath of air.

Combatting the decline of rural health

Some rural healthcare facilities do not even have obstetric units (family health doctors). This puts mothers and babies at a higher risk for complications. It is apparent over at Coffeyville Regional Medical Center by their Facebook page that they are proud of their doctor, mommies, babies, and their clinics. Kearny County Hospital recruits early career family physicians and flies in a maternal-fetal medicine specialist once a month to help with high-risk pregnancies. Everyone at Kearny takes such pride in their facility and their community. This is what will keep rural healthcare alive. 

Work with a recruiter who’s passionate about Rural Health

Here at Johnson Search Group, we get rural. In fact, our SVP Perry Paden grew up in Lenora, Kansas so there is a soft spot for Kansas right here in the office. So, we get the challenges rural health is facing and the effect it is having on communities everywhere.

Call me, Stephanie Brown. I will find healthcare professionals that want to contribute to your communities. It’s my passion and my job to support all rural healthcare facilities in Kansas. Reach out to my team and me at 205.588.8075, and we will get you the talent your community needs.