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productive

How to Be More Productive at Work

productive at work

Can you believe it’s already the end of August? Wow! Where has the time gone this year? As we approach the Fourth Quarter, many of us are already looking towards the new year. And for some, that can feel overwhelming. There’s a lot to get done between now and 2020, and our to-do list can be daunting. If you are feeling the pressure at work with that mountain of projects piling up, here are a few tips to be more productive at work.

Plan and execute

One of the quickest (and easiest!) ways to stay on track at work is to make a plan. Every day before you go home, create a plan or to-do list of what you need to accomplish the next day. The key is to prioritize what tasks or projects are the most important and tackle those first. You will feel much more accomplished if you take on the most critical or challenging tasks right off the bat. If you save the most essential or complicated tasks for the end of the day, they will loom over you all day long and distract you from actually getting your work done.

Stop multitasking

Many people claim they are great multitaskers and are perfectly capable of juggling multiple tasks at once. However, many studies, including one from Stanford University, debunks this. Simply summarized, our productivity is proven to diminish when trying to focus on too many tasks at once. Multitasking actually increases the number of mistakes you make, decreases your memory of essential details, and hurts creativity. In other words, we are far more productive when we focus on one activity or project at a time.

Establish goals

If you want to accomplish more at work, establish goals for yourself (and your team). Include both big goals and milestones and write them down on a calendar or piece of paper. As you accomplish these goals, cross them off. It may sound silly to some, but it feels great being able to check off accomplishments as you complete them! This will not only keep you on track in the short-term but will also help you prioritize your work goals in the long-term. Mainly, this will help keep your day-to-day activities on track for you to effectively accomplish those big, “scary” goals staring at you eye-to-eye.

Take care of yourself

This is arguably the most important thing you can do to remain productive day in and day out. Eat well, get enough sleep, and taking breaks from work are all essential to your physical and mental health. Use that time off as needed. After all, you’ve earned it, and that’s what it’s there for! Take small breaks throughout the day to regroup your thoughts. It will help you stay focused and productive, as well as reduce your work-induced stress. The bottom line is, if you’re not taking care of yourself, your work (and productivity) will suffer.

3 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Leaving Your Job

leaving your job

In today’s candidate-driven market, it’s really easy to think the grass is greener on the other side. But just because you have leverage and people are looking for good talent, it doesn’t mean your current position is not the one for you. Before making the big decision of leaving your job or not, you want to ensure you won’t regret your choice. So, here are three questions to ask yourself to help you evaluate what option you should choose.

Are you appreciated and rewarded for your work?

This is an important question to ask if you’re currently unhappy with your job. If your managers, bosses, and company are rewarding you for your hard work and make you feel appreciated for your time and efforts, what’s the real problem? Are they not compensating you well for these things? Do they make you jump through too many hoops to feel important? If this is the case, you may need to move on. But if they appreciate you and don’t want to lose you, then you may want to reconsider.

Not every company treats its employees well and finding a company that does can really make or break your career happiness. But, if this part of your career is not being met, there are plenty of other companies that will make you feel appreciated and valued.

Do you enjoy your working environment?

A working culture that you love being part of makes you want to wake up every morning and go to work! Even if you’re not too excited about what you have to do for the day, your work culture and co-workers can truly affect your thoughts on your job. So, if it’s not a good environment and you feel like you don’t belong, this may be the time for you to leave your job.

But if you’re able to enjoy your time at work because you have an amazing culture, you may not want to risk losing that. You can always control how you feel about what you do and if there’s an issue with your actual work, be proactive, because nothing will change if you don’t want it to.

If there are problems, have you confronted them head-on?

We all have issues at work. Whether it is someone we don’t get along with or the fact that we’re no longer doing the job we were hired to do, there will always be something. But, if you don’t confront the problem head-on, how do you expect for it to get better? If you’re having issues at work, before you jump ship, hang on. Remember why you wanted the job in the first place and weigh your options. It could all be a miscommunication. A miscommunication that is causing you to second guess, when the truth is, this could be a great position for you.

If you’ve confronted your issues and things have still not changed, this is your opportunity to leave and not feel bad or regret it. You’ve given yourself the chance to try and save a job you once enjoyed because you needed that clarity. Trying to fix issues may seem uncomfortable or useless but you’d be surprised. If you’re a valuable part of the team, they will most likely do everything in their power to keep you. And, if they don’t think so, they don’t deserve your talents anyway!

If after answering these questions you’re ready to move on, reach out to our amazing recruiters here at Johnson Search Group. They will help you find a position you won’t have to question.

Tailor your Resume

Resume: How to Tailor Your Resume to Each Job

Tailor your Resume

When it comes to writing a resume, it can sometimes feel cumbersome but, it gives every person we hand it to a first impression of who we are as a future employee. A resume is not something you want to rush to do; it’s certainly not something that is cookie cutter and can be done once and used forever. In this blog, I’ll discuss how to tailor your resume for every job you apply to, so you not only get in for an interview but hopefully get the job as well.

Be Specific

When you tailor a resume for the specific job you’re applying for, it’s imperative to ensure that you’re specific in what you’re looking for. Whether that is calling out the name of the position you want in your resume objective or why you’re the perfect fit, this will make your resume stand out. Again, it shows them that you’ve specifically created this resume just for this position and illustrates your interest. Being specific is the one sure way to tailor your resume and help you get the job.

Use Keywords from the job description

Any job description is your best friend when it comes to making a resume specific. Every job description has the keywords and skills they are looking for in a great candidate. So, if you have what they’re looking for and you use those words and skills in your resume, you can almost guarantee you will get through an ATS system and land on a hiring manager’s desk. Which let’s be honest, that’s the biggest hurdle when applying for positions you want.

Tailor your work history

When you’ve decided to apply for a new job, your work history is everything. It can get your foot in the door or illustrate that you may not have enough experience. So, to ensure you show the correct experience, make sure to tailor your work history to the job you’re applying for. The way to do this is by only adding relevant positions that pertain to the experience they want you to have. Pointing out how your jobs are connected and how it makes you a perfect fit for this new position will be a big win on your resume.

If you’re well into your career, you no longer need to add that pizza delivery postion you had for a summer during college. Only include positions that are relevant to the job you’re applyif for if you truly want to stand out.

Quantify your achievements

You want to include your achievements on your resume. However, it’s important to only include achievements that are essential to the position. These accomplishments should support your experience and match up well with the job description. And you need to ensure to quantify these skills. Putting how many of these projects you completed or how much money you saved your department makes your achievements stand out to hiring managers.

Design

Simple designs on resumes make it easy to read. It’s good to be creative and maybe adding some color can make it pop. But doing your best to not make it “too much” is necessary. You must remember that a resume should be easy to skim through and find your experience and skills quickly. This way, hiring managers don’t lose interest or get lost reading your resume.

Tailoring your resume for the specific job you’re applying for is critical to you successfully landing a job interview. Good luck and happy hunting!

interview process

Personal Brand: How to Promote Your Personal Brand During A Job Search

personal brand

There are so many aspects that go into finding a new job. Your job search takes you on a journey that goes through ups and downs but in the end, will help you find a position you enjoy. It takes time and patience to go through each step. And there is one, in particular, that could really help you stand out in front of those companies you interview with: your personal brand. Promoting your personal brand can seem intimidating but it’s all about using the resources you have to help you be successful, not only in your career but also throughout all your job search.

Use LinkedIn

LinkedIn is all about personal brand. It can have an impact on you not only reaching positions you want but also improves your chances of getting an interview with a company you like. All because your personal brand is easy to see and shows companies that you’re a candidate they want. LinkedIn gives you the opportunity to interact with your career, your company, and just get yourself out there, and in the end, that’s all you really want, especially on a job search.

Network

Network with people in your career, school, and co-workers. This will help you gain more confidence in yourself and help you reinforce the personal brand you’re trying to create when looking for a new job. Most of the time when you’re on the hunt, you’re keeping it quiet because you have a current job. Networking is the perfect place for you to feel out what is out there in your career field and see if anyone knows of a job you just can’t pass up.

Keep Social Media Private & Acceptable

Don’t forget about your personal accounts! Which is easy to do in our society today. It’s rare to meet someone between the ages of 20 – 60 who don’t have a social media account. But you need to make sure that what you’re sharing personally is still professional. It’s necessary for you to keep your personal brand in tip-top shape! Future employers will and DO look at your personal social media account. And if you have something that can seem like a red flag, they’ll probably pass on hiring you.

Share Successes

Using your successes as a stepping stone for a personal brand is a great way to show your dedication to your career and the will to always want to get better. Your “reputation,” or personal brand as we’re calling it, is something that should be handled with care but also celebrated, especially on a job search and interviews. When sharing successes, talk about the hard work you did to accomplish it, praise the people who helped you get there, and always be thankful. This will keep you on the right track of being humble and showing prospective hiring managers that you’re a good fit!

Team Player

In my experience, I would say being a team player is instrumental to not only having a strong and liked personal brand but to nailing job searches, and most importantly, interviews. When you focus on what you can do to help others, whether that’s in a job or just your daily life, it says a lot about who you are. Focusing on what you get out of it and what you can do to help others will be a trait that will take you very far in your career. Which is something every company is looking for in a candidate, right?

Overall, when you think about your personal brand, think about how you want to be perceived. In business, your reputation is everything. So be a good person. Do your best to always be respectful, stay true to your word, and make it a point to try and be better every day. If you can follow these points, you’ll you be successful in your job search and reach your aspirations, too.

The Worst Career Advice You Can Take, banking, finance, candidate, career help, career advice, career, Johnson Search Group,

Ghosting an Interview May Haunt You in the Future

Ghosting an Interview

Congratulations! You’ve landed the interview with a prospective employer. You should be excited, right? Typically, after nabbing that interview, nerves can start to settle in, assumptions about the position or company can get in the way, and ultimately, you skip the interview. This is a BAD idea.

As a recruiter, I am lucky enough to have a pretty good relationship with most of the candidates that I work with. We’re able to have transparent conversations about red flags, hesitations, or cold feet. Ghosting a recruiter or a company for an interview can not only prevent you from getting hired but can also hurt your career in the future. Here are a few reasons why you should never ghost an employer for an interview.

You Never Know Who You Will Meet

You never know who might be interviewing you. What if down the road you apply to another company, but the person set to interview you for your dream job is that person that you ghosted months or even years before?

You’ll most likely not receive an offer for the job. And leaving the interview feeling defeated as well as wondering why no one warned you about ghosting before. Well, here’s your warning! Trust me, people will remember you.

No Second Chances

You will probably never be considered again for another opportunity with that employer. And yes, I have had this happen in the past with one of my candidates. I found a great candidate for an opportunity that I was working on. After I had submitted her to my client, I got a message back saying that they do not wish to move forward with her because a year prior, she didn’t show up for her interview.

She didn’t even email or call. Companies log notes in their applicant tracking systems with your name and /or resume. When applying for a job with that same company in the future, they will search for you in their system and will have documentation of how you bailed on them in the past.

It’s Wasting People’s Time

It’s rude and wastes people’s time. You’re leaving someone to wonder if something bad happened to you or if you’re just running late. They’re taking time out of their busy schedule to speak with you and you’re inconsiderate of their time.

When it comes to filling critical positions, they just want to fill it with a candidate that cares and is going to be a good fit. But once you start wasting people’s time, that’s when you leave yourself up for vulnerability because remember, the world is small. Especially, in certain career fields or industries.

These are just a few reasons why you should never ghost a prospective employer for an interview. Your reputation is on the line and being careless about communication can come back to bite you in the future.

Balance: How Work-Life Balance is Crucial to Your Career’s Success

When it comes to your work-life balance it’s about juggling all your responsibilities in just 24 hours, every day. And it can be difficult trying to manage your time between family, work, friends, and of course, you. But balancing your work and life is a crucial part of you having a successful career.

Ways to instill work-life balance effectively

Something that is super important in becoming successful with your career and at home, is balancing your responsibilities. You can do this by making sure you’re doing things you enjoy. Whether that means enjoying your job or having fun outside of work. It can help balance you out when one of those two things are stressful or vice-versa.

Also, make sure you’re with a good company that respects you and your home life. This is key to any working relationship. When you feel appreciated and cared for, you come into work knowing what you have to do that day, as well as knowing it will not be coming home with you.

When you interview for a job, you’re also interviewing the employer to see if they are the right fit for you! You get to choose who you share your talents with (especially, with the candidate-driven market we are in). And you want to make sure it’s a company that respects and knows the difference between your family time and work time.

By taking initiative upfront, it will be easier to focus on your work-life balance and help you understand the importance of it. Without that balance, your work production and health could suffer due to unnecessary stress. Which no one wants to deal with when you’re just trying to enjoy your life and career.

How to ensure you have a good Work-Life Balance

With these simple steps, you can make sure you’re taking steps to de-stress and unplug from work and life stresses.

Workout and eat healthily – whether that is going for a walk 3-4 times a week or going to the gym. Make sure you’re taking care of your physical health. Giving yourself that time to work on improving your health will only help you feel better about yourself and accomplish more in your day to day duties.

Hobbies – Reminding yourself of the importance of doing things other than work and house chores keeps you happy and excited for what the next day brings. Having different hobbies helps you relax and take that time you need to debrief from life and work. Because de-stressing and doing the things you love to do ‘just because’ will help you stay healthy and happy. Which only keeps you more productive in the office and life.

Un-Plug from work and technology – With work and technology being so hand-in-hand nowadays, it makes it hard to truly leave work… at work. But it’s important to remember that work will always be there tomorrow. Your loved ones, friends, that age your child is today, is and will always be changing. Make sure you’re spending that time with them. Enjoying every stage of life, because one day you won’t be able to.

Your work-life balance will determine your career and life successes, so make sure you take the time to focus on each role and balance them accordingly.

“As far as I know, you only get one shot at this life. It only goes around once and time is precious. When (your) not working, you’d better spend that time with someone important.”Benjamin Bratt

 

Value during an Interview

How To Show You’re A Culture Fit During An Interview

culture fit

It’s no secret that employers are placing an emphasis on hiring for culture fit. Many companies emphasize the culture fit over hard skills, and they are looking for people to add value to their current teams. Because it’s so important, you must prepare to clearly demonstrate your culture fit during the interview. Focus on these 4 things and your personality will shine through.

Do Your Research

Before you can show you’re a culture fit for a company, you first need to understand what their culture is! Before your interview, explore their website. Find their mission statement, and try to get a feel for how they do business. Look at their social media to pick up hints about their dress code, and the general personality of the office. Still feeling unsure? Don’t be afraid to ask your recruiter if there’s anything you should know about the company culture! The fact that you’re asking demonstrates your interest in truly understanding the company and team.

Be Yourself

For a long time, it was believed that you should be strictly professional during an interview (read: a robot). Luckily, Hiring Manager’s are moving beyond that and they want to know about who you are as a whole person, not just an employee. Show your enthusiasm, discuss aspects of the job that you’re most passionate about, and throw in a few relatable tidbits.

Show Off Your Soft Skills

Companies want to know that you will fit in with the existing team, so personality traits such as self-motivation, teamwork, and a positive attitude are high on their “must-have” list. To learn more about how to highlight your soft skills during an interview, hop over to our blog post here.

Relate To Your Interviewer

While you’re doing your pre-interview research, check out the interviewer’s LinkedIn profile and look for commonalities. Did you go to the same school? Did you both work retail jobs early in your career? Maybe you even have a few connections in common. If you can relate to the employer on a personal level, it will leave an impression that lasts long after you’ve walked out the door.

interview process

Things Never to Do Within the Interview Process

interview process

You’re excited. They called you back for an interview. Finally, the opportunity you have gone to school for, the opportunity you were born for. The first step has been completed, and I’m here to provide several tips that I hope all candidates utilize throughout their interview process. The first moments after being notified by a hiring manager, a member of the HR team, or a recruiter like myself are the most critical when it comes to locking down your position with your dream company.

Here are things you need to avoid during the interview process if you want to land the job.

Pre-interview

  1. Don’t reschedule the interview. If you cannot show the company you are reliable enough to make the first step with them a priority, how can they trust you with day to day tasks? They can’t.
  2. Never assume the entirety of product and services that the company sell/offers/markets. Understanding what makes the company go is critical. Understanding what your role is in the process, even more so.
  3. Avoid connecting with all of the employees on LinkedIn. Coming off too strong and assumptive can raise red flags for employers.

During the interview

  1. Don’t assume that because your BFF works for the company that you’re as good as hired. Don’t rest on the fact that you know someone that works within the institution.
  2. Even if it is a casual interview (ie. Coffee, lunch, or any casual setting) make yourself accountable and professional. Always assume that you don’t have the job and you haven’t done enough to guarantee a position.
  3. Try not to rely too much on past work history. The company is interested in where you have come from and what accolades you have earned, but they are more interested in what accolades you are going to earn with/for them.

Post-interview

  1. Fail to follow up and thank all parties involved with your interview.
  2. Start sharing with your network that you believe you killed it (regardless of how well you actually did). Words can get back to anyone, and you don’t want the company hearing that you’ve gone and hired yourself.
  3. Please, never quit your current job (if applicable). even if they verbally offer you the job on the spot, never quit your current position until you’ve signed the offer letter.

If you manage to avoid all of these landmines, you’ll be setting yourself up for interview success. Good luck!

social media

How Your Social Media is Hurting Your Job Search

social media

It’s 2018, and almost everyone has at least one social media account. 81 percent of Americans have at least one social media profile. And employers are aware of this. In fact, 93% of recruiters and human resource professionals check out candidates’ social media profiles before extending a job offer.

Whether it’s LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram, the content you publish on these sites can prevent you from landing your next job. Here are some things to avoid to ensure your social media doesn’t ruin your chances of being hired.

Bad mouthing your employer, job, or clients

We’ve all been frustrated with our job or employer at times. And if you work in a customer service-oriented industry, you’ve probably been irritated with a customer/client as well. However, social media isn’t the appropriate place to vent about your feelings towards your co-workers or clients.

Don’t complain or bad mouth anyone you work with. If a prospective employer sees any post like this, it will surely leave a bad taste in their mouth. If you have any old posts bashing someone you work with, please do yourself a favor and delete these posts.

Inappropriate content

I do not have to go into great detail here; everyone knows what they should and shouldn’t be posting on social media. And if you even have to question whether it’s appropriate to post, it’s probably best to not post it.

Use your common sense and avoid posting/sharing/retweeting/liking something that could offend or scare off a potential employer. Avoid posting anything extremely political, offensive, or controversial.

If you have any old pictures that you wouldn’t want an employer to see, remove them. I would advise you to go through all of your old photos and ensure there is nothing incriminating or embarrassing on there. It may seem like a hassle but it is totally worth the time to ensure your social media doesn’t affect your job search!

Delete old profiles you no longer use

Have any old profiles you maybe forgot about? Is there an old Myspace profile handing out there with tons of embarrassing posts? Have duplicate LinkedIn profiles with one having out-of-date working information? Get these cleaned up before you even submit your application, so you don’t hurt your chances of some old or inaccurate information about you being discovered.

Do a quick Google search with your full name and your city. For example, search “John Smith Dallas, TX” and see what pops up. You may be surprised with what will generate in search results when you search your name and location. If you find an old social media account, recover it and either clean it up or take it down entirely.

Update your social media privacy settings

At the very least, update your privacy settings on your social media accounts so others cannot see your content without your permission. You can easily make your Instagram and Twitter accounts private. This will require people to request permission before they can see your content. Additionally, you can update your Facebook so other users cannot see your content on your newsfeed unless you accept them as a friend.

Just be sure to update your profile and cover photos! Almost anyone will be able to see them (regardless of your privacy settings) as they check out your profiles during the recruiting process.

next employer

4 Things to Look for In Your Next Employer

next employer

As you search for a prospective employer, look for companies that will fit your personal career growth and be willing to find a team that you can impact. Be sure to do so while you are at the top of your game, not when you’re stuck sitting on the bench. Here are four things to look for in your next employer.

Opportunity for Growth

According to a LinkedIn research, 45% of people left their job due to lack of opportunities for advancement. No matter which stage of your career you’re in, you should always be on the lookout for a job that will allow you to learn and grow, while offering challenging opportunities and meaningful investments in your future. This will look different to every candidate, so focus on what you want out of your career and which stage you’re at this moment to determine what’s most important.

Things to look for: Opportunities for advancement, visionary leaders, adaptability to market changes.

Stability

It is important when evaluating job opportunities that you take a strong look at historical stability. Around 50% of new businesses fail within 5 years, and we live in a time when even veteran companies who failed to evolve over time are closing their doors. It’s important to have a strong understanding of the companies you want to work for and their financial stability in the past, present, and future.

Things to look for: Earnings stability, the relative value compared to other companies, employee tenure

Mission and Values

An essential aspect of a modern-day career is to work for a company whose values align with yours. If you’re looking for a career and not “just a job,” you must be able to buy into the mission of the company. It’s the mission that keeps you motivated when the everyday drudgery of the tasks leaves you in the dust. “If the why is strong enough, the how takes care of itself.”

Things to look for: Employee tenure, social media presence, charity work, Glassdoor reviews

Leadership

The second most common reason people leave jobs is being unsatisfied with senior management. Even if the pay is great and the work-life balance is wonderful, poor leadership is like building a house of cards and hoping the wind doesn’t blow. People find themselves drawn to leaders who inspire, advise, mentor, and encourage their employees.

Things to look for: Glassdoor reviews, tenure, LinkedIn recommendations, company reputation

You may have additional things that are important to you during a job search. However, these are most common among mid-to-senior level professionals. Interested in finding a company that matches all four? Shoot me an email with your resume and I’ll show you what’s out there. You might be surprised!