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3 Common Traits of Candidates Who Get Hired

get hired

A little background. I recruit exclusively in Mining and Heavy Industrial; however, we have two other divisions at JSG: Healthcare and Finance & Banking. Although we work in different industries, we spend a lot of time collaborating. Each of us makes hundreds of phone calls a week and share both pain points and success stories. One thing that seems to be a commonality, regardless of the industry, are certain traits we often see in candidates who get hired. Here are three of the most common traits of those candidates who get hired.

Clear communication

The first and most important trait of candidates who receive an offer is clear communication. Communication is especially essential at the beginning of the process. Keeping recruiters and the client in the loop on your current working situation and other interviews is important. This insight helps let me know what to tell the client; things like knowing your availability helps me communicate with the clients and schedule interviews at a time convenient for both of you.

Unfortunately, the main reason we see deals fall apart is not based on skill set or experience. It’s the lack of communication and ability to connect with hiring managers. If you cannot exercise clear communication throughout the entire hiring process, it will hurt your chances of receiving an offer.

Due diligence and preparation

If a recruiter is doing their job properly, the candidates they submit will have the clients’ desired skill sets. What separates equally qualified candidates is the candidates who take the time to research the company and location prior to the interview. I have seen numerous candidates qualified on paper try to just “wing” the interview. This usually yields poor results.

Employers want to know you have taken the time to look into the organization, programs they offer, their company culture, and the community.

Being humble

Across the board, at all levels of positions, the candidates we see receiving job offers are the candidates that have a sense of humility. I have worked with arrogant candidates from laborers to CEOs. Having the mindset that you’re the best in the business (even if you are) rarely works out for the candidate. Companies want a talented individual that wants to come work for their organization and are willing to take the necessary steps to learn from the people currently doing it.

I have had candidates blow interviews because their interviewer was younger than them and they didn’t deem that appropriate.  At the end of the day, no matter how qualified you are, if the interviewers can’t develop some rapport with you, chances are the client will move on.

If you’re on the job market and need help finding your next position, let’s have a conversation. I will help you throughout the hiring process and ensure you are prepared to impress your interviewers.

Being A Professional is Not Always Easy

bad news

As an executive recruiter, there are many aspects of my job I absolutely love. One of the things I love the most is knowing I have the privilege to deliver for a customer and change a candidate’s life with a new opportunity. However, with this job, there are certain responsibilities I have that are not very fun.

As a professional recruiter, it is part of my job to sometimes deliver bad news. It is important my customers and candidates know I am extremely invested in their success and that I am transparent in my communication.

Bad news is better than no news

In a dream world, I would fill every job order with a perfect candidate; every candidate would receive a job offer. But in reality, we all know this doesn’t happen. I’ve heard from customers and candidates on numerous occasions that it is common for recruiters to ‘ghost’ them instead of delivering the bad news. In my opinion, there is nothing worse than not knowing. I get it, nobody wants to make these calls, but as a professional, it has to be done.

On the customer side, it is all about building the relationship, sometimes through brutal honesty. Whether the job requirements or compensation needs to be reevaluated, or a candidate withdraws from the process, my purpose is always to reach the end goal: filling the position with the right candidate.

Regarding the candidates, I understand being notified you are not being considered for a role is never easy to hear. Before making this call, I do everything I can to get feedback to possibly help you in the future.

Communication is key

Whether you are a client or a candidate, my goal when making these calls is simply to continue the clear lines of communication. It’s my job to ensure I am delivering on my commitments. Although sometimes unpleasant, the bad news is better than no news.

If you’re looking for an honest recruiter with clear communication, let’s have a conversation.