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How To Answer "What Are Your Salary Requirements" In An Interview

How To Answer “What Are Your Salary Requirements?” In An Interview

This interview question continually tops the list of the most dreaded questions. No one likes talking salary – hiring managers included. However, it’s a necessary step to a successful partnership. In this case, there really are no ulterior motives. A hiring manager needs to understand your salary requirements in order to make you a competitive offer.

How To Craft Your Answer

First, it’s essential to understand your rights when it comes to answering this question. In many states, it is illegal for a company to ask you about your current salary. However, you should have a salary range at the ready when asked. This requires doing your research and understanding your value before you go into an interview. Utilize a website such as Payscalesalary.com, or Glassdoor to find the standard range for your position and experience level in your area. Then, calculate an educated estimated salary based on your experience and the salary range of the posted job.

Example Answer For “What Are Your Salary Requirements?”

“With my experience and skills in this industry, I would expect to receive a salary in the range of $60,000 to $70,000 a year.”

When it comes time to present your answer – keep it simple! There will be room for negotiations down the road. Know your worth and own it!

Bonus:

If you’re partnering with a recruiting firm such as Johnson Search Group, we help significantly with addressing your salary requirements. From the beginning of our relationship, we’ll help you establish an appropriate range for your experience and career goals. Additionally, we discuss your range upfront with the hiring manager, leaving no room for awkward conversations. If it is brought up during the interview, you can always just request that they refer back to your recruiter.

Ready to take the next step in your career? Contact Johnson Search Group today to get started!

job interview fails

3 Job Interview Fails You Can’t Recover From

A job interview is your opportunity to impress your prospective employer. And often, this is your first interaction with your potential manager. Thus, you must bring your A-game! However, once the nerves kick in, sometimes mistakes are made, and the meeting doesn’t go according to plan. Here are three job interview fails you can’t recover from and how to avoid them altogether.

Canceling or rescheduling with a lame excuse

At Johnson Search Group, we have facilitated millions of interviews with our candidates. And like most companies in this candidate-driven market, we have heard some pretty lame excuses for canceling an interview, most of which being “medical emergencies.” We get it, life happens, and sometimes you have to cancel or reschedule plans.

However, just be honest with the interviewers. If you have to cancel or are no longer interested, tell them. No company will be mad if you are honest with them. You will be saving them the headache of shifting their plans around at the last minute. And if you cancel your interview and an employer thinks you’re lying, you probably will never get a second chance with that company.

You can’t explain why you’re on the job market

If you can’t explain why you’re on the hunt for a new job, you won’t make a good impression on the hiring manager. This question will likely surface in every interview, and it says a lot about you as a candidate. So, whether you’re unemployed, recently fired, or just looking for another job, you need to be able to explain why you’re looking for new opportunities (and why you’re a great fit!). And whatever you do, never badmouth a current or previous employer. It will leave a bad taste in the employer’s mouth.

Create distractions during your interview

A big-time job interview fail is creating distractions during your interview. Eliminate them at all costs by thinking about anything that could distract the interviewers. Turn your phone off to ensure a text message doesn’t interrupt your conversation. Have good posture, make direct eye contact, and try not to fidget in your chair or nervously tap your feet. Failing to sit still is distracting to everyone in the room, so even if you do so subconsciously, try to sit calmly.

Most importantly, dress appropriately for your interview. If you are in a professional setting, wear a suit and tie or a skirt. If you at an on-onsite walkthrough of a manufacturing floor or industrial environment, wear proper shoes and protective gear as necessary. Essentially, wear the proper outfit for the environment you are interviewing in to ensure your dress code doesn’t create any hiccups.

JSG has tons of job interview advice

Most job seekers have mucked up an interview at one point or another. After all, we are all human. But if you can avoid these three job interview fails, you will make a great first impression and set yourself up for a successful meeting. Good luck, and if you need more interview advice, check out our blog section discussing the best interview tips and tricks.

before your interview

What to do the Night Before Your Interview

Congratulations, you’ve landed an interview! If you’re anything like the rest of us, you’ll probably have some pre-interview jitters the night before. However, there are a few things you can do to prepare ahead of time and help calm those nerves. Here are a few of our favorite “night before” routines!

Prepare Your Outfit

The last thing you want to do the morning of a big interview is run around trying to assemble your best outfit and make sure they are ready to go. Pick out what you’re going to wear, get everything ironed or steamed, and even select your accessories. Are you taking a purse or briefcase? Ensure that everything you need is packed. We recommend a pen and notebook, extra copies of your resume, and maybe a water bottle. That way, when you wake up, you can walk out the door with ease and confidence!

Research The Company

You may already know a lot about the company you’re interviewing with, but it’s still essential to brush up on recent news. On top of reviewing their website and the job description, do a quick Google Search. Have they been featured in the news recently? Check out their different social media pages for recent updates that you can mention during the interview. It may even inspire a great interview question!

Review Interview Questions

While there’s no way to tell precisely what the interviewer will ask, it can’t hurt to review common interview questions. There are a few questions like “why do you think you’d be a good fit for this job?” or “what’s your biggest weakness?” that come up frequently. Mull over these questions and strategize about how you would answer. Then, if they do come up, you won’t be completely caught off guard!

Take A Final Look At The Interview Details

On top of researching the company, review the final details of the interview. Make sure you know who you are meeting with, where you are going, and where you should park. If there’s anything you’re unsure about, make a note to call the receptionist in the morning! As a final step, type the address into your preferred Maps app and get an approximate travel time so you can plan ahead. We recommend getting there at least 15 minutes early to give yourself some wiggle room for the unknowns!

Last but not least, get a good night’s rest! You want to make sure you’re on, you’re A-game for every interview, and that starts with a restful night of sleep.

interview tips

Interview Tips and Mistakes to Avoid

As a mining and heavy industrial recruiter, I get a unique perspective of companies’ interviewing processes and procedures. While working with dozens of clients, I have seen a wide array of interview types. The most common interview process my candidates go through is the initial phone interview. After every interview, I get the opportunity to get feedback from both the candidate and the hiring manager. Even in today’s tight market, there are some things many candidates, unfortunately, do that can hurt their chances of securing a new job opportunity.

Even the most experienced job seekers are prone to interview mistakes. Here are several interview tips to be cognizant of during the initial screening.

Make a strong first impression

Making a good impression over the phone can be difficult. An excellent way to combat this is to prepare yourself for the phone interview properly. First of all, know your audience! Take some time to learn about whom you’ll be interviewing with and do your due diligence on the company. If you are working with one of my fellow recruiters at Johnson Search Group, we will prep you for your phone interview. We tell you who you’ll be speaking with and give you some guidelines to have a successful conversation.

We always recommend getting yourself in a quiet space if possible, with good reception and a fully charged phone. Have the job description and your resume in front of you. Also, when you answer the phone, be upbeat and start with a simple, “Hello, this is <state your name>.” This may seem like common knowledge, but it sure beats an awkward exchange at the beginning of the phone call.

Always be prepared

After you exchange some pleasantries, the actual interview will begin. You can generally expect this common question out the gate: “Why are you on the job market?” It can be helpful to have an answer already formulated, explaining why you are interested in the position. And if your working with one of our recruiters, we will help you devise an appropriate response. TIP: Never bad-mouth your employer!

After a few more follow up questions, the interviewer will ask about your experience and likely walk through your resume. This is why having your resume in front of you is helpful, as you discuss different jobs, qualifications, or accomplishments listed on there.

As the interview wraps up, they will ask if you have any questions. Here’s another tip: ALWAYS have questions prepared to ask the interviewer. Whether it’s a technical skill question, leadership question, or a question about the hiring process, try to have questions ready for your interviewer.

Questions to avoid

Avoid asking questions regarding time off, the benefits package, and the compensation. While these are essential questions, asking these questions during your initial phone interview is not the right time, unless they bring it up. If you are working with us, we will help you navigate these difficult conversations. If you have questions about compensation or the process, we can ask the hiring manager or human resources, so you don’t have to tiptoe around them.

At the end of the interview, be sure to tell them that you’re interested in the position, as well as ask for the next steps. This will let the interviewer know that you’re serious about the position and excited about the opportunity.

Partner with a recruiter

If you’re thinking about looking for a new opportunity, have you thought about partnering with a recruiter? My team and I will help you through the entire interviewing process, from start to finish. We will help prep you for each interview and ensure you’re ready for every single step of the way. Reach out to one of my talented colleagues or me if you’re ready to make your next career move.

These Interview Questions Will Reveal The Most About Candidates

When interviewing candidates, not every question is created equal. If you’re referencing an outdated list of interview questions that you found on the internet, you’re doing yourself (and your candidates) a disservice. A focused list of purposeful questions can reveal a lot about a candidate and how they’ll fit into your open position.

Behavioral questions

These questions typically begin with, “tell me about a time…” Your aim is to have the candidate explain past situations and how they handled them. Try to customize the question to accurately represent situations they would encounter if they were to join your team. Here are some of our favorites:

  • Give me an example of a time you faced a conflict while working on a team. How did you handle that?
  • Tell us about a time when you did not meet a customer’s expectations. What happened, and how did you attempt to rectify the situation?
  • When you’re working with a large number of customers, it can be difficult to deliver excellent service to them all. How do you go about prioritizing your customers’ needs?
  • Tell me about a time you failed. How did you deal with the situation?
  • Explain a time you had to be very strategic in order to meet all your top priorities.
  • Tell us about a successful presentation you gave and why you think it was a hit.
  • Describe your proudest professional accomplishment.

Personalized questions

Questions that directly relate to a candidate’s resume and experience will always reveal a lot about them and how they’ll function at your company. Try asking them to expand on statistics listed on their resume. Additionally, choose projects they’ve worked on that are especially pertinent to the role they’re interviewing for and ask them to elaborate.

We encourage you to continue asking personalized interview questions throughout your entire meeting. If something a candidate says sparks your interest, don’t be afraid to follow up and ask for more information.

Application questions

Every company and every team has unique situations that your employees run into. Be sure to ask your candidates real-world application questions that could be a part of their everyday life if they secure this job. Maybe there’s a project that your team is currently brainstorming. Ask the candidate about their ideas or how they would approach that particular situation.

why are you leaving your current job

“Why Are You Leaving Your Current Job?” Interview Question

why are you leaving your current job

A job interview is a necessary step in your path to a new career. With some insight and study, it’s the perfect place to demonstrate why you’re the right candidate for a job. The questions asked may differ interview to interview and industry to industry, but there are a number of mainstays that are worth brushing up on.

Chances are good that the job you will be interviewing for is not your first job. It’s even more likely that you are currently employed elsewhere, and this interview itself is another step closer to your exit from your current employer. So, don’t be surprised when they ask, “Why are you leaving your current job?” or, “Why did you leave your last role?”

Employers ask this question for several reasons. The entire purpose of the interview is to gauge your skills, but it’s also to get to know you better and gauge your fit at the company. Why you decide to leave can paint a clearer picture of things like what drives you and how you deal with confrontation. They also hope to detect and avoid serial job hoppers, who are becoming increasingly common in this economy and the hot job market.

How Should I Answer?

There are a few answers that are red-flags to a hiring manager. Even if the interview has been great up to this point, a poorly worded answer to this question could be a deal-breaker. The main thing you want to avoid is bad-mouthing your current or past employers. Without knowing you or your situation outside of this interview, it could very well leave a bad taste in the hiring manager’s mouth.

Instead, focus on positives. Does this new position offer better professional growth or opportunities otherwise not available to you in your current role? Does this new company’s mission align more closely with your core beliefs and values? Maybe it’s closer to home? Whatever your answer, make it clear that you’re looking for more in your future, whether that’s growth, challenges, or a supportive team.

For bonus points on this question, think beyond yourself. Employers want team players who will mesh and build their existing company culture. Thinking ahead to how you could make an impact on the team and the company as a whole shows forethought. It will also have the hiring manager picturing you as an employee, which is always a good thing!

Hopefully, you’re a little more prepared to answer why are you leaving your current job in your upcoming interview. And if you need more help prepping for your interview, check out some of our job interview pointers.

Failures

Failures: How to Address Your Failures in Your Interview

FailuresWhen you think of failures you probably assume they are a negative thing to discuss, right? Well, when it comes to interviews discussing your failures, it’s all how you frame them! And here’s how you can address them in a way that puts your best foot forward.

Questions focusing on failure

When in an interview you’re normally a little nervous about what kind of questions they’re going to ask. But, if you prepare, it will be a lot easier. You can almost always count on a question about a past failure to be asked during an interview. Whether that’s, “why did you get fired?” “Why did you leave your last job?” Or “tell us about a failure?” You will need to be prepared to answer them honestly.

These questions help the employer get to know who you are and how you react to hard times. A failure can be looked at as a negative, but potential employers want to see how you have let your failures help you grow and become a better employee. It’s not just about the failure; it’s about how it helped you in the long run.

How to spin failures into achievements

When you answer these questions about your failures, take your time. Make sure that you’re thinking about what you learned, not how you felt. Because no one likes failure… But it’s what you take away from it that can make you either successful or not.

And in a job interview, you want to show that you’ve grown and become more successful because of your failures. If you spin your failures into achievements, such as a better job, a better outlook, becoming more successful, or anything that shows you’ve accomplished something due to failure, demonstrates that you’re adaptable and very hirable. Which of course, is what you want hiring manager’s to see you as.

Why talking about failures can help you land the job

When you get asked failure questions in an interview, it can be a moment where you show the interviewers you’re the perfect fit for the position. Your outlook on different complications is a huge soft skill that can either kill your chances of getting the job or get your hired. If you have a positive and optimistic outlook, as well as take responsibility for your faults, it shows them you can work well in any environment.

If you’re able, to be honest, and open about your faults, it will 100 percent help you land your dream job.

Failure questions will always be an important part of the interview process, and if you follow these tips it will help you be more prepared to rock these questions! And in turn, will show the prospective company you’re ready to fill their new position.

JSG Spills Our Favorite Interview Questions

Our team talks to thousands of candidates day in and day out. It’s our job to have conversations with and evaluate hundreds of people for each position to get to the one or two candidates that will make an immediate impact into an organization. From this process, each one of our Account Executives has narrowed down a favorite interview question that really helps them get to know who they’re talking to. We’ve asked them to spill the beans and share those favorite interview questions (and some even gave the answers they look for!)

Mining

Jeremy Johnson: Can you do the job? Would you do the job? Will you relocate?

Ken Heller: Tell me about your background.

Alex Price: Why did you join the mining industry?

Dana Belstler: Where do you see yourself going?

Jeremy Johnson: Explain your job in layman’s terms.

Banking

Krista Portolesi: Why are you looking for a new opportunity?

Mike Muglia: What does your next opportunity look like?

Tracy Isakson: Doesn’t really have a specific question – asks a series of questions to really understand each candidate on a deeper level.

Healthcare

Michelle Smith: What do you like to do for hobbies?

Dallas Williams: What does relocation look like for you?

interview questions

The Best Interview Questions to Land the Job

interview questions

You’re in an interview for a position you’re really excited about. Things are going well. You’re having a great conversation and learning a more about the role. Then, the interview finally comes to a close and the hiring manager asks: “Do you have any other questions about the job or the company?” *insert blank stare*

Now is your time to shine but you, unfortunately, have drawn a blank. Instead of awkwardly coming up with a question at the last second, ask one of these insightful interview questions to leave a lasting impression.

What immediate impact can I make when I start this position?

By asking this question, you are doing two things:

1) Painting a picture in the interviewers’ minds that you are going to be hired. By saying “when I start this position,” you are essentially saying you are a good fit for the role and the interviewers will start picturing you in the position.

2) This will allow the employer to discuss any issues within the department or organization as a whole. This gives you an opportunity to address any last-minute problems the company is facing and illustrate how your background can help solves these issues.

If I get this job, who will be my mentor?

This question is really impactful and almost nobody asks it in an interview. By asking this question, you are showing that you are coachable and willing to learn from someone who has the experience to share. It also shows that you are thinking of the big picture. You’re not just thinking about landing the job, you are thinking about who will guide you to success in the position!

What do you enjoy about working here?

This is one of my go-to questions in any job interview. This provides a better understanding of the people in the room that you’ll be working with and it also gives you an idea of what it’s like to work for the employer. This question is so essential because it helps the interview end on a positive note; everyone is talking about all thing great things about their employer. Additionally, if people don’t have a lot of nice things to say about the employer, it may be a red flag to look for other opportunities out there.

When can I expect to hear from you?

This question is great to ask if it hasn’t already been addressed. This shows that you are eager about the opportunity and will give you an idea of when you can follow up with hiring manager if you don’t hear back from them by then. It also gives you a piece of mind of what the next steps are in the hiring process. Every company is different. Some take a few short weeks to fill a position while others take months. Knowing when you can expect a decision takes some of the stress off your plate and gives you an understanding of what to expect next!

Asking one these questions will step up your interview game and definitely leave your interviewers impressed. Good luck!

what's your greatest strength?

Interview Question: What’s Your Greatest Strength?

what's your greatest strength?

What is your greatest strength? This is probably one of the simplest questions you’ll be asked in an interview. However, many people struggle to answer this question effectively. It can be difficult to talk about ourselves and the interviewer is trying to take you out of your comfort zone.

Here’s what you need to know to effectively answer this question and nail your next interview!

Tie your strength into the job description

Generate a list of all the things you are good at. Even if you don’t think it’s a “real” strength, write it down. Only write down professional strengths. After all, this is an interview and no employer wants to hear that you’re great with animals or you are really good at playing tennis.

Now, review the job description and find where your strengths align with what the employer is looking for. This is the absolute best way to answer this question. Tailoring your answer to the job you are applying for will help illustrate to the interviewer that you are qualified for the position and that you’ve done your homework.

Be able to back your strengths up

The strength you choose to answer in your interview is not nearly as important as your reasoning for selecting that strength. You cannot expect your future employer to believe your answer without concrete evidence!

Begin with directly answering the question, and then shift your answer into a brief story that illustrates your skill. This is your chance to show that you are a great fit for the role and that you align with company’s values.

For example, “I would say my greatest strengths are my communication and writing skills. Having worked as a marketing specialist for over three years, I have tons of experience with writing in different voices to captivate various target audiences. As a marketing manager, I will have the ability to effectively write blogs and generate press releases to effectively communicate with different audiences.”

An answer that followers with a story will help highlight your passion while also showcasing that your experience aligns with the job description.

Be honest

This is the most important part of answering this question. I promise it will not go well if you exaggerate your answer, or worse, even blatantly lie about your strength. If you are not honest about the strength that you provide, it may make or break your interview. They will likely ask you to elaborate on your answer, sparking up a conversation that you’re not equipped to have.

Exaggerating on this answer is never a good thing. Most interviewers will see you spinning in circles as you try to play it off in your interview. It’s best to be your authentic self and provide an honest strength that is tailored to the job. The interviewer is looking past canned answers for who you really are. So, don’t be afraid to answer questions truthfully.

Now that you’ve tackled this question, click here to learn how to answer the dreaded: “What’s your biggest weakness?