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hiring

The Ultimate Hiring Playbook

hiring

As the summer sun starts to wane, you’re probably already looking ahead to next year. You may be contemplating the goals you want to accomplish, how much you’d like to grow your team, and even how you can streamline operations. No matter what’s on your mind for 2020, there’s no doubt that hiring will play a big part in your strategy! And in a candidate-driven market, it can be overwhelming to strategize how your company will compete for the top candidates on the market.

But don’t worry… we’re here to help! The JSG blog is full of expert hiring advice from those that really know best – our recruiters. Here are some of our most recent resources to help you prep for hiring an outstanding team.

3 Soft Skills You Need To Hire For

While every company and hiring manager will want to look for different traits, we’ve listed 3 of our top soft skills to look for. Read More

How To Get The Candidates Your Team Needs

Are you one of the many employers struggling to navigate today’s tight labor market? If so, here’s how to streamline your hiring process. Read More

Is Candidate Experience Hindering Your Hiring?

One of the main factors affecting your company’s ability to attract and retain qualified talent is your candidate experience. These are the make or break steps throughout your hiring process. Read More

The Best Way To Interview Candidates Over The Phone

When interviewing candidates remotely, it’s important to maximize the opportunity and get all the information you need. Follow the link for a few things to keep in mind when you schedule your next phone interview. Read More

3 Tips For Maximizing Your Hiring With A Recruiting Firm

Follow these tips, and you’ll be able to hire the talent you need and establish a long-term working relationship with your partnered recruiters. Read More

What Today’s Talent Really Wants

When thinking about your recruiting strategy, be sure to push the boundaries of “standard” job offering by incorporating some of the following elements. Read More

These Interview Questions Will Reveal The Most About Candidates

When interviewing candidates, not every question is created equal. A focused list of purposeful questions can reveal a lot about a candidate and how they’ll fit into your open position. Read More

How To Attract Millennial Talent To Your Organization

By 2025, Millennials will make up 75% of the workforce. So what can your team do to secure this majority workforce? Read More

How Good Is Today’s Job Market?

You’ve read the news and seen the reports. The labor market is competitive. But is today’s job market really as strong as people think it is? The short answer is yes! Here’s a brief overview of today’s job market and how to navigate it if you’re an employer. Read More

soft skills, interviewing, hiring

3 Soft Skills You Need To Hire For

soft skills, interviewing, hiring

When you’re hiring your next team member, you will most likely scour their resume for hard skills. Do they have the experience and skills to perform the job? However, we recommend you take it one step further. Think of a list of necessary soft skills that will contribute to your team’s productivity and culture fit. While every company and hiring manager will want to look for different traits, we’ve listed 3 of our top soft skills to look for below. Additionally, you’ll find a behavioral interview question that will help you determine if a candidate has them.

Listening Skills

First and foremost, you want your employees to have excellent listening skills. But make sure you think beyond just absorbing information. Try to find people who will listen to feedback, take direction, and utilize that information in the future. Your best employees will use everything they learn to form their future strategy.

Question to ask in an interview: Tell me about a time when you took something you learned at a company and applied it directly to your job.

Ability To Take Criticism

Being receptive to feedback is what will make a good employee a great employee. You want to build a team that is not only open to constructive criticism from leaders throughout the company but also fellow teammates. As a bonus, look for someone who will not only accept the feedback but grow beyond exactly what they’re told and look for opportunities for self-improvement.

Question to ask in an interview: Tell me about a time when you received constructive criticism and used it to improve.

Grit

Every year, we pick a theme here at Johnson Search Group to guide our strategy. This year, we chose to focus on grit. By definition, grit means “firmness of mind or spirit; unyielding courage in the face of hardship or danger.” Your dream employees will be able to power through any trials or tribulations that come their way. They will take obstacles in stride and become better having gone through them.

Question to ask in an interview: Tell me about a time when you faced a difficult situation at work and how you overcame it.

recruiter, phone interview

The Best Way To Interview Candidates Over The Phone

recruiter, phone interview

For many companies, the very first step in the hiring process is a phone interview. It’s a great way to narrow down your pool of candidates, to get to the handful of top contenders that you’d like to interview in person. However, when interviewing candidates remotely, it’s important to maximize the opportunity and get all the information you need. Here are a few things to keep in mind when you schedule your next phone interview!

Communicate details

Prior to a phone interview, communication is key. Make sure that the candidate knows who is calling who, the expected length of the interview, and if they should have anything special prepared.

If you have a recruiter or HR team coordinating the phone call, ensure they include your name, title, and contact information. This will ensure that the candidate has the opportunity to do their research ahead of the interview!

Plan ahead

Because phone interviews tend to be a truncated version of their in-person counterparts, you want to have a planned structure. Head into the meeting knowing what information is most important and what you’d like to take away from it. Then, plan your questions based on your ultimate objective. Of course, you can improvise throughout the interview, but having a list of topics to cover will guarantee that both you and the candidate walk away feeling accomplished.

Set the tone

Phone interviews can be nerve-wracking for candidates. As the interviewer, you are responsible for setting the tone of the interview. Host the phone interview in a quiet place with limited distractions. Always try to ease into the conversation with the usual small talk, allowing the candidate to get comfortable. That way, they’ll be able to open up as the interview goes on!

Follow up

After the interview, the candidate will (hopefully) send a thank-you note. This is the perfect opportunity for you to communicate the next steps. Regardless, it’s important that the candidate knows what to expect moving forward. And if you decide not to move the candidate to the next step, the sooner they know, the better!

How To Come Off As Confident, Not Cocky, During Your Interview

How to Come Off As Confident, Not Cocky, During Your Interview

How To Come Off As Confident, Not Cocky, During Your Interview

We spend a lot of time talking to candidates. Recently, we were prepping a candidate for an interview and they shared something that caught us off guard: “I never assume that I know more than the people on-site.” It got us thinking – there IS a very fine line between being cocky and confident. Here are 5 ways you can ensure that you portray confidence during an interview without letting your ego take over.

Don’t interrupt or disregard what the interviewer is saying

When you’re interrupting, you come across as arrogant. Listen actively and wait to speak until the interviewer has finished. It may be hard to not be overly confident in a role that you feel like you’re perfect for. Maybe you’re a subject matter expert and are perfect for this job. This does NOT mean that you know more than the interviewer. Be humble, show respect, and your confidence will show.

Give facts and results

You don’t need to tell the interviewer how great you are by using fluffy adjectives to describe your work ethic. Use facts to support why you’re great for the role. For example; rather than saying “I am a great manager,” try using results: “I boosted my teams’ morale from 80% to 95% over the course of my career.” Stating facts will display WHY you’re a good fit and you’ll exude confidence at the same time by backing your experience up with factual evidence!

Don’t be afraid to admit mistakes

A lot of times, employers ask the tough question “what’s your biggest weakness?” or “Tell me about a time when you have failed.” Rather than answering the question with a cliche answer about how you can do no wrong, employers are looking for someone that is confident enough to admit when they have a weakness or have made a mistake in the past and learned from it. This gives you the perfect opportunity to show what you’ve done to overcome your weakness and how it’s made you even better.

Due diligence will go a long way

The more you research a company and the role you’re interviewing for, the more confident you’ll be. Knowing your skills and what the position entails will give you the tools you’ll need to explain why you’re a good fit.

Share credit

Be sure to give credit where credit is due for your past successes. For example, if you led a sales team that was #1 in sales for two consecutive years, make sure to acknowledge those team members for playing their part in that achievement. Showing recognition for those that contributed to your successes shows that you’re a team-player and that you respect your colleagues.

You can have all the right skills and experience, but if you come across as arrogant or cocky during the interview, it can completely ruin your chances of getting the job. If you go into an interview assuming you have a lot to learn but exude confidence on why you’re a great fit, your chances of being hired increase exponentially.

An Inside Peek At The Modern Candidate

An Inside Peek At The Modern Candidate

An Inside Peek At The Modern Candidate