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Perfecting The One-Page Resume

Perfecting The One-Page Resume

You may have heard that it’s ideal to keep your resume under one page. And while that’s not always the case, it is a good rule of thumb for a lot of candidates! In fact, 66% of employers say entry-level workers should have one-page resumes, while 77% of employers say seasoned workers shouldn’t use one-page resumes. If you fall into the first category or somewhere in between, it’s worth a shot to keep your work history on one page.

So, let’s say you’re putting together your application and your resume is just over a page. You may have only a couple of lines spilling over onto the next page, or maybe even a whole section. Before you go panicking, here are a couple of tips that can easily make all of your experience and accomplishments fit on a single page.

Tailor Your Resume

It should first be noted that you should be tailoring your resume no matter how long it is! Take a look at the job description and consider the company. Then, leave only your most relevant skills and accomplishments highlighted. Keep an eye out for specific keywords you can incorporate (it just may help fast-track your resume to the “yes” pile!)

Cut Out Unnecessary Sections

There’s still some debate on whether a summary or objective is necessary to include on your resume. It depends on several things, including industry, experience level, and the specific job. If you find yourself in the category of not needing one, cutting it will save you some valuable space! Additionally, you should not include references or even “references available upon request.” Lastly, unless you are fresh out of school, feel free to remove relevant coursework, your GPA, or any other academic achievements. For the most part, employers will focus on your work experience and skills! (And you can always elaborate in a cover letter!)

Check Your Formatting

You would be surprised at how much space a few minor formatting changes can add! Here are a few things to check:

  • Margins

Your margins should be narrow, meaning 0.5” all around. (We wouldn’t recommend going any less than that in case of printing issues)

  • Font

Please note, we are not encouraging you to make your font teeny-tiny in order to cram everything on one page. You can maybe get away with a 10 pt. body font, but we want you to check out those headings! Sometimes heading fonts can be as large as 24 pt., so you can get away with significantly reducing those to save some space.

  • Layout

If you’re reasonably familiar with manipulating documents, try a different layout than the more traditional setup. Multiple columns or added text boxes can fill what would otherwise be wasted white space.

Keep in mind, your resume might not fit on one page (and that’s okay!) However, when it comes to job applications, the simpler the better. Looking for more resume tips? Check out the rest of our blog!

resume objective, resume summary, resume

Should You Include A Resume Summary Or Objective

resume objective, resume summary, resume

A highly contested topic in the world of recruiting and hiring is the use of an objective or summary on a resume. Should you include one with your job application or not? First of all, let’s breakdown what a resume summary is. Essentially, it’s an “elevator pitch” at the top of your resume. Consider it a place to highlight your most relevant experiences and skills to quickly prove value. Now, let’s consider the pros and cons of including one or not.

When you should forgo a summary statement or objective

In most cases, you should leave the summary statement or objective off of your resume. The primary reason being that it takes up valuable space! The first section of your resume is prime real estate, and you don’t want to fill it with unnecessary reiterations of your resume. In many cases, it can detract from what is most important. If your objective is too general or doesn’t include a clear call to action, it will distract from your qualified experience and skills.

When you should use a summary statement or objective

There are a few limited situations in which a resume objective or summary is necessary. One instance is if you are a seasoned professional with quite a few years of experience. If this is the case, a summary can be great for tying together multiple roles with a common theme.

Another instance in which you’d want to use an objective would be if you have a varied background. For example, if you’ve had jobs in multiple industries utilizing a wide variety of skill sets, a summary or objective can provide clarity about the direction you’d like to take your career. You can maximize this space by focusing solely on your work history.

How to write a great summary statement or objective

The key here is to keep it simple and straight to the point! Be as specific as possible and clearly state your goals and how they relate to the position to which you are applying. Here is a great example:

“Objective: To utilize my 15+ years of experience in Mechanical Engineering, along with my passion for Project Management in a leadership role at a growing industrial company committed to sustainability.”

And as always, keep in mind that your resume is your own. Focus on what works for your experience and future career goals!

resume

The Best Way to Structure Your Resume

resume

You, like many other candidates, have tons of great experiences, accomplishments, and skills that you want to highlight on your resume. However, there is often confusion regarding the order in which you should display all of these details. If you’re one of many candidates taking advantage of this tight labor market, here is the ultimate guide on how to structure your resume.

Contact information

First of all, you must include your contact information at the very top of your resume. Be sure to include your name, phone number, email address, and maybe even the link to your LinkedIn profile. Recruiters and hiring managers look at dozens of resumes each day. You want to ensure they can quickly identify you and find all your necessary contact details!

Resume objective/summary

If you feel so inclined to include a resume objective, this is where you should put one. Keep your objective or summary brief and to the point. An objective should illustrate what you wish to accomplish as a professional applying for the position. And if you include a summary, provide an overall summary of why you’re a strong candidate for this position. However, don’t get lost in the weeds! The rest of your resume should point out why you’re a great fit for the position.

Work Experience

Now, this is where the bulk of your resume’s content will be. You will want to display your work experience in reverse chronological order. In other words, you want to go in descending order, starting with your most current work experience. Some people argue that you should list your most relevant experience first. However, that can confuse a recruiter or hiring manager and make your work history look like a jumbled mess. Instead, list your work experience starting with your current position and only include details that are relevant for the job. That way, there is no confusion about your job history, and it will be evident to the reader that you are qualified for the job.

Education

Now that you have all of your work history and accomplishments nicely displayed, your education goes next. Include the school you attended as well as the degree or certification you received. Don’t include your GPA unless you’re right out of school. Employers are more concerned with your work experience and degree than your grades.

Certifications

After your education, list any certifications you have achieved. Whether it’s an SPHR or a Lean Six Sigma certification, this is where you’ll want to place those. All you need to include is a list of any certifications you’ve earned and the date you achieved them.

List of skills

Finally, you want to include a list of skills at the very end of your resume. This is optional, but we would highly recommend adding a concise list of your top hard and soft skills. The key here is to add skills that help you stand out as a great applicant for the position. With almost every employer or recruiting firm utilizing an applicant tracking system, it’s imperative that your skills are transparent.

Your resume is ultimately yours

Overall, this is an excellent guide for those looking to restructure their resume. Ultimately, your resume is your professional summary of your experience as an applicant. So you are, of course, free to create your resume as you please. However, if you follow the guidelines above, you will help position yourself as a professional applicant!

If you are looking for more resume advice, check out our list of resume recourses!

Why You Need To Customize Your Resume To Every Job

We can all agree that putting together a resume isn’t one of our favorite ways to spend our free time. Which makes the thought of creating a different version of your resume for every single job you apply to just a tad intimidating. If you’re actively on the market for a new position, it’s downright overwhelming. However, the key to landing your next job and advancing your career lies in a well thought-out and tailored resume.

Employers Are Looking For Specific Keywords

Many employers still use an ATS system to filter candidates. When they’re sifting through hundreds of resumes, it is the fastest way for them to identify those who are qualified. (Other than working with a recruiter, of course!) Knowing this, check out the job description and pick out keywords that match your qualifications. Be sure to highlight and feature those throughout your resume. This will push you right through the ATS system and onto the next round.

Titles Are Ambiguous

Just because two roles might have the same title doesn’t mean the duties and necessary skills will be the exact same. Job descriptions and duties can vary drastically depending on the industry, company, and seniority of the position. While you’re going through the job description looking for keywords, pay close attention to the subtleties of how this position may be different or similar to roles you’ve had in the past. Pull out experiences, quantified achievements, and skills that you’ve accumulated over the years that pertain to each specific listing.

Varied Skillsets Offer Unique Value

Just because your past experiences don’t exactly match the job description you’re applying to, doesn’t mean you should take them off your resume completely. Think about each role that you’ve held. Paint a picture of all the different skill sets that you have gained over the years and how they might pertain to this specific application. Many employers value a variety of past experiences and the depth of knowledge that brings to a team.

The couple extra minutes you put into your resume for each position will pay some serious dividends when it comes to securing that offer. Think of it as a precursor to the dedication you will put into the job once you’re hired!

Tailor your Resume

Resume: How to Tailor Your Resume to Each Job

Tailor your Resume

When it comes to writing a resume, it can sometimes feel cumbersome but, it gives every person we hand it to a first impression of who we are as a future employee. A resume is not something you want to rush to do; it’s certainly not something that is cookie cutter and can be done once and used forever. In this blog, I’ll discuss how to tailor your resume for every job you apply to, so you not only get in for an interview but hopefully get the job as well.

Be Specific

When you tailor a resume for the specific job you’re applying for, it’s imperative to ensure that you’re specific in what you’re looking for. Whether that is calling out the name of the position you want in your resume objective or why you’re the perfect fit, this will make your resume stand out. Again, it shows them that you’ve specifically created this resume just for this position and illustrates your interest. Being specific is the one sure way to tailor your resume and help you get the job.

Use Keywords from the job description

Any job description is your best friend when it comes to making a resume specific. Every job description has the keywords and skills they are looking for in a great candidate. So, if you have what they’re looking for and you use those words and skills in your resume, you can almost guarantee you will get through an ATS system and land on a hiring manager’s desk. Which let’s be honest, that’s the biggest hurdle when applying for positions you want.

Tailor your work history

When you’ve decided to apply for a new job, your work history is everything. It can get your foot in the door or illustrate that you may not have enough experience. So, to ensure you show the correct experience, make sure to tailor your work history to the job you’re applying for. The way to do this is by only adding relevant positions that pertain to the experience they want you to have. Pointing out how your jobs are connected and how it makes you a perfect fit for this new position will be a big win on your resume.

If you’re well into your career, you no longer need to add that pizza delivery postion you had for a summer during college. Only include positions that are relevant to the job you’re applyif for if you truly want to stand out.

Quantify your achievements

You want to include your achievements on your resume. However, it’s important to only include achievements that are essential to the position. These accomplishments should support your experience and match up well with the job description. And you need to ensure to quantify these skills. Putting how many of these projects you completed or how much money you saved your department makes your achievements stand out to hiring managers.

Design

Simple designs on resumes make it easy to read. It’s good to be creative and maybe adding some color can make it pop. But doing your best to not make it “too much” is necessary. You must remember that a resume should be easy to skim through and find your experience and skills quickly. This way, hiring managers don’t lose interest or get lost reading your resume.

Tailoring your resume for the specific job you’re applying for is critical to you successfully landing a job interview. Good luck and happy hunting!