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Tailor your Resume

Resume: How to Tailor Your Resume to Each Job

Tailor your Resume

When it comes to writing a resume, it can sometimes feel cumbersome but, it gives every person we hand it to a first impression of who we are as a future employee. A resume is not something you want to rush to do; it’s certainly not something that is cookie cutter and can be done once and used forever. In this blog, I’ll discuss how to tailor your resume for every job you apply to, so you not only get in for an interview but hopefully get the job as well.

Be Specific

When you tailor a resume for the specific job you’re applying for, it’s imperative to ensure that you’re specific in what you’re looking for. Whether that is calling out the name of the position you want in your resume objective or why you’re the perfect fit, this will make your resume stand out. Again, it shows them that you’ve specifically created this resume just for this position and illustrates your interest. Being specific is the one sure way to tailor your resume and help you get the job.

Use Keywords from the job description

Any job description is your best friend when it comes to making a resume specific. Every job description has the keywords and skills they are looking for in a great candidate. So, if you have what they’re looking for and you use those words and skills in your resume, you can almost guarantee you will get through an ATS system and land on a hiring manager’s desk. Which let’s be honest, that’s the biggest hurdle when applying for positions you want.

Tailor your work history

When you’ve decided to apply for a new job, your work history is everything. It can get your foot in the door or illustrate that you may not have enough experience. So, to ensure you show the correct experience, make sure to tailor your work history to the job you’re applying for. The way to do this is by only adding relevant positions that pertain to the experience they want you to have. Pointing out how your jobs are connected and how it makes you a perfect fit for this new position will be a big win on your resume.

If you’re well into your career, you no longer need to add that pizza delivery postion you had for a summer during college. Only include positions that are relevant to the job you’re applyif for if you truly want to stand out.

Quantify your achievements

You want to include your achievements on your resume. However, it’s important to only include achievements that are essential to the position. These accomplishments should support your experience and match up well with the job description. And you need to ensure to quantify these skills. Putting how many of these projects you completed or how much money you saved your department makes your achievements stand out to hiring managers.

Design

Simple designs on resumes make it easy to read. It’s good to be creative and maybe adding some color can make it pop. But doing your best to not make it “too much” is necessary. You must remember that a resume should be easy to skim through and find your experience and skills quickly. This way, hiring managers don’t lose interest or get lost reading your resume.

Tailoring your resume for the specific job you’re applying for is critical to you successfully landing a job interview. Good luck and happy hunting!

Quality Resume

Quality: How to Build A Quality Resume

Quality Resume

When you’re constructing your resume, it’s imperative to remember this is the first impression an employer will see. It’s the first opportunity they have to make their own conclusion of your skills and if you will be a good fit for their team. So, making sure you leave a good impression without spelling mistakes, lies, a hard-to-read resume, or skills that are not fully quantified is needed.

Here are some tips to help you build a custom, quality resume that’ll make hiring managers fight over you.

Marketing Tool

Sometimes it’s best to wipe the slate clean. With so many different resume templates online, you have the opportunity to find a format that you like and really get to the good stuff. The first thing you should think of though is that your resume is the marketing tool that will get you the job you want. It will get your foot in the door and could really help make you stand out from the crowd. With that being said, you need to know how to make it to really impress those hiring managers.

Use Keywords

When writing a resume, you want to ensure you customize each one to the job you’re applying for. This may seem repetitive and a waste of time but in the end, it helps you share your passion and qualifications within every resume. Which in turn will help you get your resume seen, and hopefully, get you called in for an interview!

Keywords are a great way to customize every resume to a specific job. And the best way to find these keywords is to look through the job description and pick out the skills they are really looking for. These words will be easy to find because they will pertain to the job and the skill sets the employer is looking for. So, making sure you use them throughout your resume will get it through any company’s ATS and help get your resume on the desk of the people who matter.

Quantify

Always quantify your skills and experience! If you think about when someone tells you they have experience doing something, which statement is more impactful? Them saying they have a lot of experience or them saying they have 15 years of experience? That right there is the main reason why you want to quantify everything you can.

It helps you put more facts behind your skills and proves that you know what you’re doing. You can quantify cost savings on a project, or revenue generated for your department. Any numbers like these will help you get your point across about your knowledge as well as make it easy to illustrate that you have the right experience for the position.

Bullets & Sections

Splitting up your resume into sections is a great way to keep it organized and easy to read. And when you make each section concise by adding bullet points, it makes your resume stand out and helps you not bog it down with big chunks of text that take away from your skills and experience. Including these visually appealing aspects will tremendously add value to your resume.

Focus on Positive

Always focus on the positive. Your resume is your opportunity to share your accomplishments and successes. In an interview, they can ask you about the hard times. But on your resume, making everything about the positive things you’ve done is the right way to showcase yourself. We’ve all made mistakes and had struggles in our careers but thankfully our quality resume doesn’t have to be a tell-all story about them!

Easy to Read

If you look at your resume and question if it is easy to read, it probably isn’t. One of the most important things every resume needs to be is quickly readable. If it’s not, you may miss out on the job even though you have the perfect qualifications. So, remember that before you make it too fancy! Easy and simple to read will always be your best friend when it comes to crafting a quality resume.

Review

And finally, the last thing you must do before submitting your resume is review it. The last thing you want in your resume is grammatical or spelling errors. It can really set the tone of how people think of you and the interest they believe you have in the job. Don’t let minor issues that can be fixed before you apply to a job call the shots on whether you get an interview or not!

Overall, there are a ton of things you can do to build a quality resume. It may seem like a lot to consider for just a piece of paper; however, these tips are a make-it-or-a-break-it chance for you to get the job you’re applying for. So, spending some time and effort when crafting your resume is definitely time well spent!

resume

What Am I Looking for on a Resume?

resume

We’ve published many articles discussing resumes. However, as a professional mining & heavy industrial recruiter, what am I looking for on a resume?

Using keywords and phrases

First of all, let me explain the way most resumes are found today during an active job search, excluding direct applicants. Some sort of search is performed whether it’s online or an internal database. Knowing this, you can use keywords and phrases to your advantage. For example, if you have experience with Allen Bradley equipment, I would be sure and add PLC on your resume so hiring managers will notice you in their stack of applicants. In another case, I would be sure to use the words purchasing and procurement. Using relevant keywords on your resume just gives yourself the best chance to be seen.

Add a skills section

I always recommend including a skills section on your resume. In the mining & heavy industrial world, it’s crucial to see what skill sets a candidate has to ensure they can safely perform necessary duties of the job. You should include a bulleted covering your relevant experience. This is also another prime opportunity to add more keywords.

As good as you might be at your job, if your key skills are not easily legible, you may miss out on the job of a lifetime.

Resume format

I always get asked how long a resume should be. I have seen some great two-page resumes.

Some of the better examples I have seen have a brief summary. I personally like a resume with the most recent experience at the top. Dated in chronological order, with a company, title, and then a short overview.

Resume example for a position as a Maintenance Manager

2014 – current

ABC Company: Maintenance Manager

Responsible for 3 supervisors and 15 technicians in a 155-person continuous manufacturing facility. I oversee a maintenance budget of $xxx and schedules, including PM schedules and root cause analysis. We have improved equipment availability from 92-95% in the calendar year utilizing and KPI’s which I created after conducting a full plant analysis. Brought vibration and thermography in-house, saving $xxx.

This is just a short example of what I like for on a resume. The questions I will get from clients are going to be related to your own involvement at a job. Thus, if you can paint that picture verbally, you can get noticed and save some valuable time in the hiring process.

I hope this helps any of you who are looking for answers on a very common question I hear.

resume

The Must-Haves on a Resume in the Banking/Credit Union Industry

resume

The financial services industry is ever-changing and so are the needs/requirements for the talent the institutions typically seek. Sure, there are some positions within financial services that require past banking experience. However, we’re going to take a look BEYOND experience and discuss the other details that you must include on your resume.

Education

This may seem like a no-brainer; however including GPA, Cum Laude, or Dean’s list info can be very beneficial. Especially for those that have recently graduated. If you’re well into your career, this rule does not apply to you because your experience will speak for itself. Banks and Credit Unions also love to see any Banking-related certifications or degrees.

Certifications/Awards

Listing your certifications or awards from either prior jobs or from school is a great way to set yourself apart from other candidates that may be under consideration for the same role. There are a ton of certifications that are very desirable in the banking/financial services industry, such as CFA, FRM, CISA, or CRCM. Certifications illustrate your knowledge of the industry and show your dedication to the financial industry.

Volunteer Experience/Extra Curricular Activities

Many banks and credit unions have heavy community involvement. According to Her Campus Media, “Volunteerism can equip a student with ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ skills including technical, communication, teamwork, problem-solving and leadership, to name a few. Most people who volunteer are devoted to a cause and can easily convey their enthusiasm via a natural narrative.” These qualities that you’ve gained from volunteering—communication, teamwork, problem-solving, leadership and enthusiasm—are superb skills to have listed on your resume, cover letter, and other applications materials.

Specific Accomplishments

Accomplishments are important because it illustrates your contributions to your previous employer. When you’re detailing your accomplishments, make sure to be complete and precise in what you say. Use exact numbers or any sort of quantitative result when you can. These statements are very impactful as it shows the potential value you may add to the institution you’re applying with.

Banks and Credit Unions, obviously, are driven by numbers, most of the time. Whether it’s a dollar amount, a percentage of growth, money saved or decrease in error ratio, these are all great ways to make your resume stand out.

resume

Keep Your Resume Current and Give it a Facelift

resume

The job market can be a volatile place at times with many acquisitions of companies and layoffs. It’s hard to predict when these things can happen. The transition from employment to job search comes as a surprise. If your resume is up to date, you can quickly kickoff your much-needed job search.

Update your resume when you start a new job (keeping it current). Even if it’s a new position with the same employer. Your responsibilities may have changed or have completed a class and received a certification. Or maybe you went back to college and earned another degree. Regardless of the changes, it’s essential to always keep your resume up to date.

Give your resume a lookover before starting to make edits

  • Update your education, if you received a degree with a title, add that behind your name. You earned it!
  • Update your work history and responsibilities
  • Revise your summary since your career goal may have changed
  • Update any new skills – bullet point your most important accomplishments

Always start with your most current work history

Be sure to include these key details for each position on your resume:

  • Your position title
  • Employer’s name
  • Dates worked for that employer (i.e. Jan 2010 – March 2018)
  • A short summary of job duties and bullet points of your specific skills
  • Provide relevant statistics, such as increasing efficiencies or decreasing defects

Be concise, including too much information is a typical mistake and employers are generally interested in the last 10-15 years. And speaking of adding too much information, never include your salary details. By doing so, you may be filtering yourself out of consideration if you’re too expensive.

Use easy-to-read font and don’t use italics as they are hard to read. However, bolding your job title and employer is acceptable. Print out a copy of your resume first to see how it looks before you send it out.

Beat the ATS

Larger companies do not have time to read every resume, so they use an applicant tracking system ATS to do it for them. They scan for keywords, so most resumes are eliminated if they are missing vital words or phrases. Normally, about 75% of resumes are eliminated even before a human sees them.

Have someone else proofread it for you for spelling errors and grammar. Having a bunch of typos and misspellings is an easy way to rule yourself out of consideration.

Work with a recruiter

If you want to ensure your resume gets into the hands of a hiring manager, work with a Johnson Search Group recruiter. We have great relationships with our clients’ hiring managers and human resources professionals. When we submit you for a job opportunity, we always do a write up on you highlighting your background, skills, and experiences that the employer is looking for. We will get them excited about you and help them schedule your interview.

Good Luck and remember when a recruiter gives you a call, hear them out! They may have the opportunity you’ve just been looking for!

Marketing Yourself

Marketing: How to Market Yourself in a Tight Job Market

Marketing Yourself

When you think about looking for a new job, there can be so much more to it than just sitting down and finding one. At times you may not be “searching” for one, but you may be open to new opportunities. And if you are, it’s imperative that you market yourself in the right way! This way recruiters and new career opportunities can find you, instead of you having to search for them.

Use LinkedIn

When it comes to great opportunities and finding a network that not only can endorse you but help you find your next career, LinkedIn is a must-have! You’re able to connect with like-minded people and others who could help you find your next move.

Even though LinkedIn is a social media platform, it allows you to grow and market your skills in a network that is all about careers! And what better way to showcase your skills than on a platform that can help you grow your professional network.

Updated Resume

Even if you aren’t actively looking for a new position, it’s still important to ensure you keep your resume as updated as possible. This way if you end up finding an amazing position that you can’t pass up, you have a resume that’s ready to go and doesn’t take a whole day to update. Because as you know, in this tight market, a day could be the difference between you getting a job or not.

Market Your Skills

Another thing to do is to remember to market your skills. Being on LinkedIn is important but utilizing it to its full potential will only give you a greater chance to showcase your skills and experience. It’s also a great idea to write blogs/articles about your career, trends you’re seeing, and anything career related. This helps you market yourself as an expert in your field and gives you a chance to reach more people and expand your network.

Networking is so important nowadays because you never know who could help you make your next career move. And like they always say, sometimes who you know can get you further than what you know.

Use Recruiters

When it comes to marketing yourself in today’s tight job market, you have to remember recruiters can help. And they are hoping to find the perfect career fit for you! So, if a recruiter reaches out to you and you’re looking for a change, talk to them!

One, it means you’ve marketed yourself great and they think you’re a perfect fit for a position they are trying to fill. Two, recruiters help you through the whole process of getting landing a new job. They prep you for interviews, help the company get excited about you, and increase your chance of getting an offer!

If you’re looking for a new opportunity and would like to work with an awesome recruiter, check out Johnson Search Group! We are here to help you find the perfect career fit.

illustrate your leadership

Leadership: How to Illustrate Your Leadership Skills in a Job Interview

illustrate your leadership

Leadership is a huge soft skill that employers are looking for. And in today’s candidate-driven market, it can make up for someone not having as many of the hard skills an employer may want… But having this great soft skill means you could get the job just because of your leadership skills. And to help you illustrate your leadership, here are a few key things you can say and do in an interview.

Write it in Your Resume

Sometimes you can look over your own leadership experience, especially if you’re not a manager. But managing a product launch, a new project, or a team within your company all show compelling leadership skills that could help you more than you think. When you take on a leadership role without it being a part of your job title, it shows initiative and that you want to be a leader.

In a job interview, this is one of the best things you could include in your resume. Companies are looking for someone who isn’t just waiting to be told what to do and tries their best to come up with new ideas and is willing to put them into action. So, make sure to put your best foot forward and add these experiences even if you think they aren’t that big of a deal.

Give Examples

When in the interview, give examples of your leadership experience. When they ask you to talk about yourself and your past accomplishments, bringing up your leadership successes shows you are someone who not only thinks about their own success but is also a team player. Giving examples isn’t boasting about your success. It’s proving that you can not only do the job but that you’re ready to be a leader as well! Give yourself the credit you deserve.

Answer Questions by Incorporating your Leadership Experience

When you can lead back to it, make sure you do so. Interviewers are trying to get to know you and all aspects you bring to the table. There may be a few hard skills that you don’t have tons of experience in but if you can explain that your soft skills can make up for that, you’ll nail the interview.

Use this Soft Skill to Sell your Other Skills

Out of all the skills you have, soft skills like leadership and attitude will help you attain goals and hopefully jobs over any other hard skills you have. Having a leadership mindset and attitude can help a company sometimes so much more than having the required technical skills. So never downgrade the advantages your soft skills can give you.

If you’re in an interview and want to make sure you take advantage of your soft skills this is the way to do it. Reminding those you’re interviewing with that you’re there to be a leader and help the company grow will only help you when it comes to getting a job offer!

Keywords

Keywords: How to Determine Which Keywords are Relevant

Keywords

When you’re wanting to apply for a new job, the first thing that pops into your head probably isn’t what keywords you should use in your resume to get noticed. And that’s normal! But when it comes to customizing your resume before you apply to a job, focusing on keywords can be the reason you get a job!

This action is looked over often, but with so many Application Tracking Systems (ATS) being used to screen resumes before they land on a hiring managers desk, it’s important you take the time to ensure you explain your skills in a way that will get you on their desks. And well, hopefully, hired.

Why Keywords?

When you think about it, keywords are normally the skills and experience companies are looking for you to have. So, finding the right keywords is not as complicated as it may sound. If you focus on mirroring the job description, you will get past the ATS in a breeze. In the job description, there will be great words that you can pull from to help fill your resume.

All of these are specific keywords that an ATS will be looking for before your resume gets passed on to the next level. So, make sure you do your due diligence and see what skills and experience they are really wanting and put them into your resume.

What Keywords are relevant

Depending on the position you’re applying for keywords will vary. But like mentioned above, mirroring the job description will be one sure way to ensure your resume gets seen. You want to use words that explain your experience and include the skills they are looking for. If they need you to have multiple certifications, make sure to include them as well.

The one thing you always need to do though is spelling out acronyms. Because even though an ATS is smart, not spelling out everything could filter out your resume, even if you have the necessary skills. And therefore, knowing the right keywords to put into your resume is essential.

What Keywords you should not use

There are also, of course, keywords you should avoid. When you think about revising your resume, you obviously want to make it the best it can be! Sometimes though, we forget how certain things may seem like a good idea to write down, but in turn, are not. Stay away from negative words and overly used phrases. Avoid lying.

If you aren’t an expert in something, don’t say you are. In this tight market, employers aren’t looking for someone who is an expert in all the skills they would like a candidate to have. They are looking for someone who is trainable, a good fit, and honest about what they can and cannot do. And finally, avoid overcomplicating things with big keywords that you think will make you seem smarter and better for the role.

If you’re applying for a role, it’s most likely because you’re interested in it. Overall, keyword “stuffing” will only hurt your chances of landing the job. Keywords are an important part of applying for new and exciting positions but there is a method to the madness! And hopefully, you have a better understanding of their importance and how to use them properly.

 

resume

Resumes: It’s All in the Presentation

resume

Resume writing has evolved significantly over the years. There was a time when you could put just enough information on your resume to get some interest from HR or the hiring manager and get that phone interview or onsite to elaborate further, and hopefully, seal the deal.

Now, you need to have a much more detailed resume sharing all your experience and having the proper “buzz” words to catch their eye; or in most cases, the software doing the scanning for them. Here are some facts you need to know when updating your resume.

Your resume is your first interview

Seriously. Slapping that puppy together in a rush to get it out, is going to stop you dead in your tracks. You should understand what position you are applying for, what the position entails, how your experience fits in, and customize your resume accordingly. One size fits all = a BIG FAT lie!

Chopping it down to 10 years

To all my more experienced professionals out there: be careful how much you chop. Going back to my first point, you will need to customize your experience. Leaving off years of experience can put a kibosh on any chance at getting a callback. I understand that you are trying to stay fresh and competitive, but in doing so, you could be selling yourself short. I suggest customizing and making sure that if the experience they are looking for was 15 or 20 years ago – ensure your resume reflects that 20 years’ experience. If they don’t see what they are looking for on the paper; you won’t get a call or a chance to defend your experience that is not reflected on your resume.

Presentation, presentation, presentation!

Spend some time on your resumes. Bad formatting, misspellings, and poor grammar will get you every time. I’ve seen some creative and interesting resumes but remember that sometimes overdoing it in the opposite direction can be just as bad as not doing enough. Present a clean, well formatted, detailed, grammatically correct resume and you won’t go wrong. If your resume is scanned and you’ve got some crazy graphics and formatting, it could alter your resume, potentially dropping important information.

References

No! Don’t do it!! Never put your references on your resume. If an employer would like to check your references, they will ask for them. References get stale; they can develop grudges; references can change phone numbers. You may think all is good, but it just takes one call and a disgruntled reference to put an end to everything. Another reason not to add references? You are giving leads to employers and even recruiters to scour through. Your references may even be called to interview against you! It has happened.

One-page resumes

Really? That might be great for someone who has had one job and held it for 5 years, but this is the real world. Trying to squeeze 5 or even 15 years onto one page isn’t going to benefit you. I hear this all the time: “my career counselor or the resume service said it should really be one page – no more than 10 years’ experience.” Why would you do yourself a disservice by censoring your career experience and accomplishments? It just doesn’t make sense.

Job hunting typically isn’t fun; it can be stressful and tiresome. A resume that properly represents your experiences and accomplishments and that is complete, clean and neat looking will help alleviate some of that stress. Wonder why you aren’t getting any calls? Look at your resume. Then call your references and ask how their job hunting is going.

applying for a job

Are You Considering Applying For A Job On Our Website?

applying for a job

First things first, I’m excited you found our website and are looking at our job openings. While you’re here, take some time and look at all the great candidate resources available to you. From CV letters to interviewing tips, we have you covered.

But for now, if I am lucky enough to have you apply for one of my mining or heavy industrial jobs, there will be certain things I want to see on your resume, as well as certain things I need to hear when talking with you on the phone.

On your resume

Experience

I want to see in your background that you’re qualified for this position. Ideally, that you’re currently in a similar role or the role that you’re applying for is the next natural progression in your career path.

Results

In today’s candidate-driven market, clients want to see measurable results. Whatever the result (decreased downtime by x%, x number of days without a safety incident, increased production by x%, increased revenue by x%), make sure it’s on your resume.

Job specific certifications

Regardless of the role you’re applying for, there are job-specific certifications, especially in the mining industry, that help me show my clients that you’re the right person for the job.

On the phone

Motivation

When we talk on the phone, I’m really going to dig in on why you’re looking to make a move. Why have you applied for this specific opportunity? What are you looking for in your next employer? There are many reasons and motivating factors for why people change companies, and my clients want to understand this before interviewing candidates.

Soft skills

I invest a great deal of my time with my clients, and therefore, understand what their organization wants and needs very well. With many of my clients, a candidate’s soft skills are just as important as the hard skills. You and I might not specifically talk about your soft skills, but I can guarantee I’m actively listening for them during our conversations.

Consistency

Anybody can read a resume and I certainly will read yours before we talk. I want to hear from you about your previous work experience and day-to-day activity. I need to ensure it’s consistent with what I’m looking at on your resume. If I’m going to represent you to my client, we need to always be consistent.

Good luck with your job search, and I hope we can work together!