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How Your Social Media is Hurting Your Job Search

social media

It’s 2018, and almost everyone has at least one social media account. 81 percent of Americans have at least one social media profile. And employers are aware of this. In fact, 93% of recruiters and human resource professionals check out candidates’ social media profiles before extending a job offer.

Whether it’s LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram, the content you publish on these sites can prevent you from landing your next job. Here are some things to avoid to ensure your social media doesn’t ruin your chances of being hired.

Bad mouthing your employer, job, or clients

We’ve all been frustrated with our job or employer at times. And if you work in a customer service-oriented industry, you’ve probably been irritated with a customer/client as well. However, social media isn’t the appropriate place to vent about your feelings towards your co-workers or clients.

Don’t complain or bad mouth anyone you work with. If a prospective employer sees any post like this, it will surely leave a bad taste in their mouth. If you have any old posts bashing someone you work with, please do yourself a favor and delete these posts.

Inappropriate content

I do not have to go into great detail here; everyone knows what they should and shouldn’t be posting on social media. And if you even have to question whether it’s appropriate to post, it’s probably best to not post it.

Use your common sense and avoid posting/sharing/retweeting/liking something that could offend or scare off a potential employer. Avoid posting anything extremely political, offensive, or controversial.

If you have any old pictures that you wouldn’t want an employer to see, remove them. I would advise you to go through all of your old photos and ensure there is nothing incriminating or embarrassing on there. It may seem like a hassle but it is totally worth the time to ensure your social media doesn’t affect your job search!

Delete old profiles you no longer use

Have any old profiles you maybe forgot about? Is there an old Myspace profile handing out there with tons of embarrassing posts? Have duplicate LinkedIn profiles with one having out-of-date working information? Get these cleaned up before you even submit your application, so you don’t hurt your chances of some old or inaccurate information about you being discovered.

Do a quick Google search with your full name and your city. For example, search “John Smith Dallas, TX” and see what pops up. You may be surprised with what will generate in search results when you search your name and location. If you find an old social media account, recover it and either clean it up or take it down entirely.

Update your social media privacy settings

At the very least, update your privacy settings on your social media accounts so others cannot see your content without your permission. You can easily make your Instagram and Twitter accounts private. This will require people to request permission before they can see your content. Additionally, you can update your Facebook so other users cannot see your content on your newsfeed unless you accept them as a friend.

Just be sure to update your profile and cover photos! Almost anyone will be able to see them (regardless of your privacy settings) as they check out your profiles during the recruiting process.

3 Things You MUST Do Before Applying for A Job

applying for a job

So, you’re sick and tired of your current job and decide to start searching for other opportunities. You hop online and start scrolling through dozens of job openings. After a few hours of searching (and a couple cups of coffee later), you find your absolute dream job. But WAIT – before you even think about submitting your application, there are a few things you need to review to ensure you’re not impulsively hitting the ‘send’ button.

Check Review Sites

Before you get your heart set on that dream job you think you’ve found, it’s a good idea to jump on your computer or phone and check online reviews on the employer. You can go to sites like Glassdoor or Vault and get tons of information on prospective employers before you even apply.

These sites have a wealth of knowledge, including employee reviews, reviews on the interviewing process, salary information, and much more. These review sites can give you an idea what the culture is like of the organization, how tough the interviewing process is, and what current and former employers think of the organization.

This may help you gain some valuable insight on some tough questions that may be asked during an interview, spark some inspiration for questions to ask during an interview, or depending on the reviews, persuade you not to apply for the job altogether.

Check Out The Employer’s Website

Another source to check out is the company’s website. I know this seems obvious, but it’s shocking how many candidates fail to do a deep dive on a potential employer’s website before applying for a job.

Most employers have tons of information on their website that will help you tailor your resume and cover letter for the position. You can find things like the company’s mission and vision statements, news and events, and insights into the company culture.

Almost every employer has an ‘About’ page with all the information you need to write a masterpiece of a resume to impress the hiring manager, and ultimately, help yourself standout in the sea of applicants.

Do A Social Media Audit

Before you apply for ANY job, take a peek at the employer’s social media accounts. This will give you a better understanding of what the company culture is like. You will likely find things like press releases, new product launches, company events, and much more. Social media is a great outlet to find the latest news about the organization you are interested in. And sometimes, you may even learn more about a company from their social media than from their website.

You can also do a little digging on the hiring manager on LinkedIn. Head over to LinkedIn and search the employer in the search bar at the top of the page. Then, filter the search results by ‘People.’ This will allow you to see current employees of the organization and find the people you’ll likely be working with. Also, this will provide insight on the makeup of the team and help you decide if you really want to apply for the position or not.

Audit Your Own Social Media, Too

While you’re at it, this is a great opportunity to do a little research on your own social media. Before you hit the job market, it’s a good idea to run a social media audit on yourself. Go to your profiles and double-check what you’ve published and what you’re tagged in. If you wouldn’t want an employer to see it, it’s best to delete it from your profile. And at the very least, you can change your profiles privacy settings so others cannot see your content without your permission.

To kick your online cleansing up a notch, do a quick Google search on yourself. Google your first and last name and the city you live in. You’ll be surprised what will appear! There may be an old embarrassing MySpace account or another social media profile that you almost forgot about. Again, if you find something that you don’t want prospective employers to see, it’s best to delete or hide it.

You best believe employers will do a quick search on you before they call you in for an interview!

3 Keys To Getting Discovered (And Hired) Online By A Recruiter, recruiting, mining, heavy industrial, price, smart,

3 Keys To Getting Discovered (And Hired) Online By A Recruiter

3 Keys To Getting Discovered (And Hired) Online By A Recruiter

In today’s job market, there are more ways than ever for job seekers to find employment opportunities in any industry. Social media and online resume databases have become the primary source to connect candidates to their dream jobs. As a recruiter, I rely heavily on social media to find and contact potential candidates. So today, I’m sharing my secrets on how to stand out on social media and get noticed by recruiters like me.

First, you have to understand that when a recruiter embarks on a search to find a “perfect candidate” for their job, they are sifting through thousands of resumes. Throughout this massive pile of resumes, there are a few simple things that make a candidate’s resume stand out online. Follow these 3 resume guidelines and you’ll be on your way to being discovered in no time:

  1. Clear

Most social media platforms will capture key words off resumes so they know who to include in searches. It is important to have industry specific words on your resume so the recruiter’s search will pull up your resume. This includes job titles, specific skills, and industry related experience. For instance, if you have OSHA certification, make sure it’s on your resume so that my search will find you if that’s a “must have” skill for the company I’m partnering with.

  1. Current

You would not believe the amount of old and outdated resumes we find online. Be sure to have an updated version of your resume when posting with current contact information. The more updated your resume is, the more industry-related keywords and accomplishments it will contain, and the better your chances of being found!

  1. Concise

If your resume contains irrelevant positions, keywords, or education, you’re doing yourself a disfavor. With only a short amount of time to review each resume, a recruiter could see a position that doesn’t match the skill set or career trajectory they’re looking for, you could be overlooked. Instead, keep only the most relevant and recent positions and education listed on your resume.

Keeping resumes clear, current, and concise with industry keywords, education, and experience will make them rise to the top of a recruiter’s search online.

Is Your Social Resume Ready?

Is Your Social Resume Ready?

Is Your Social Resume Ready?

As 2017 is right around the corner, so is one of the biggest hiring years for the US. The job market is going to be extremely competitive as companies start looking for top talent to help them stay competitive in their industry. Whether you are going to be actively or passively looking for a new position, now is the time to start to prepare your resume.

Many people think of a resume as just that one to two-page document that you try to cram your life experience onto. However, this is just a small portion of your resume. Everyone that has a computer, tablet or smart phone has some sort of Social Media footprint. This media is used by Hiring Managers, Human Resources, and Recruiters to help find and screen candidates. How does this stack up to your competition?

Facebook:

You might say that Facebook is not a professional site, so it shouldn’t necessarily reflect who I am professionally. Wrong! If you put it out there in cyberspace, then it is fair game for a potential employer to look at and judge you by. As you are reading this, you might be yelling at your computer screen saying “they can’t do that, my private life is my private life!” But stop and think of it this way, if your private life is your private life then why are you posting it for everyone to look at? Here are some tips to help clean up your Facebook profile:

  1. Change your security settings so that only friends can see your posts.
  2. Do not comment on political and religious posts.
  3. Review your profile pictures and delete your nightclub, and other potentially embarrassing profile pictures that you may have published in the past.
  4. Do not add co-workers/bosses/potential bosses/people you don’t know as friends.

LinkedIn:

LinkedIn is considered a professional media outlet and can be a great tool to add onto your paper resume. You should always keep your posts professional. Remember, LinkedIn is often used as a pre-interview interview. Posting or replying to posts that are not considered professional is an unwritten LinkedIn taboo and potential employers can see everything you do on LinkedIn. Here are some great tips for setting up a great LinkedIn Resume:

  1. Set a Headline that sets a value statement about yourself.
  2. Use a recent picture of yourself.
  3. Take this picture in clothing that you would go to an interview in for your profession.
  4. Use a picture that is of your upper body or a headshot.
  5. Smile in your picture. (For us prior military this is a hard concept to understand but it makes you more relatable!)
  6. Have a high quality background photo. Photos catch people’s eyes and make them linger longer on your profile.
  7. Ensure your professional timeline on LinkedIn matches your paper resume.
  8. Add your education and the schools you attended.
  9. Add skills, awards, professional papers, hobbies, and interests.
  10. Write your profile using keywords that are relevant to your experience and industry. Most companies and recruiters use keyword searches when searching for candidates.
  11. Join groups that are relevant to your profession or location.
  12. Follow companies that you would like to be a part of.
  13. Be active – reply to and share professional posts.

Now that you have your Social Resume in order, get ready for the interview you’re about to have!

Here's What Recruiters Looks For In A Candidate's LinkedIn Profile

Here’s What Recruiters Look For In A Candidate’s LinkedIn Profile

Here's What Recruiters Looks For In A Candidate's LinkedIn Profile

As recruiters, we spend a lot of time browsing LinkedIn profiles. There are a few things that a recruiter notices right away that either signal “I need to talk to this person,” or “pass.” While a detailed description of what you do is essential to your online professional persona, you might be surprised to see a lot of soft skills and career patterns on these lists. We asked 3 of our recruiters to share what they notice first when screening LinkedIn profiles, whether good or bad:


“First I look for a well written Summary that is not too long, that has current keywords that are appropriate to the current and past roles. Additionally, if there are typos it is a huge turn off. I am also looking for a progressive track in the industry as additional skills are learned. If the profile looks like the candidate changes careers every few years, let alone changing jobs every couple of years, it is suspect. The ‘specialized’ skills that I would want to find for my client is gained from progressive experience and must be present in the profile to be of significant interest.

Education, awards, and special interests like community involvement also speaks to the ‘soft skills’ of the candidate that I find valuable.”

Tracey Smith, Healthcare Team Lead


“The biggest thing I look for is connections / activity because that lends credibility to their technical savvy.  Next I am looking for depth of profile history – looking for what I can talk to them about. Lastly, I look for recommendations because if someone takes the time to recommend them I want to surround myself with that type of individual.”

Mike Muglia, Executive Recruiter – Banking


 

Professional Networking on Social Media: Real or Myth?

Professional Networking on Social Media: Real or Myth?

Professional Networking on Social Media: Real or Myth?

Is social media really a place to build professional relationships or is that just a myth?

The lines between online and offline are getting more blurry by the minute. There are now more than 277 million people on LinkedIn worldwide, and those people are constantly translating their online presence to establishing legitimate professional relationships, growing their skill sets, and even landing new positions. I’ve had a LinkedIn account for years, but haven’t really embraced the idea that we can build real professional relationships in the virtual world of Social Media until recently. Sound familiar?

I am not the guy who believes everything I read online or find on YouTube. Don’t get me wrong, I am sometimes entertained by what I see online. However I never believed I could build a true professional relationship, let alone friendship, by connecting to random strangers on a Social Media platform.

Thanks to my recent experience with Elaine Longmire at Jefferson Bank my belief has been changed forever.

It started with a short message sent on LinkedIn and a brief phone call exchanging stories and experiences with Elaine. Every so often we re-connect through an InMail, email, or a phone call to touch base. Each time learning a little more about each other’s profession, families, and daily lives.

Professional Networking on Social Media: Real or Myth?

One evening I was sitting in a restaurant, and I caught a glimpse of someone who looked uncannily familiar. Bothered by the fact that I felt I somehow knew this person, but unable to remember her name, I began to approach her table. Then, in a flash, it came to me. I didn’t know her, but she looked exactly like Elaine Longmire’LinkedIn profile picture that overtime had grown so familiar. The next day I called Elaine and we had a good laugh about her Spokane-based doppelgänger. This experience exposed the power of social media, because I realized that I had developed a real relationship with someone I had never even physically met. This relationship was even real enough for me to mistakenly recognize an online connection in the “real world.”

Social Media provides many opportunities not just from a professional prospective, but from the ability to establish genuine relationships on and offline. It has always been my goal to make a positive and meaningful impact on each and every person, I encounter in my day to day adventures.

My social networking to “real-world” networking story proves that we impact each other on Social Media every single day. I encourage you to graduate some of your online networking efforts to real world business contacts. You never know what may come of it! If I haven’t had the chance to shake your hand in person or virtually through the phone lines, I look forward to visiting with you soon!

The Do’s and Don’ts of Getting Social in 2016

Social Media Icons, job search

Social media for hiring is at an all-time high. Today, 92% of companies use some sort of social media for recruiting. LinkedIn leads the way with 93% of companies using it, followed by Facebook at 66%, and Twitter at 54%.

With that being said, job seekers need to be careful with what exactly they are posting across the internet. 3 out of 4 hiring managers and recruiters admit to checking out a candidates’ social media pages before hiring. And 1 in 3 hiring managers and recruiters admit to having rejected a candidate based on something they found.

Did you know that in the US, 14.4 million people have used social media to search for a job? In fact, 29% of job seekers admit to using social media as their primary tool for job searching.

There’s no denying that the web can be a powerful tool when it comes to finding a job. When used correctly, social media can help you find the right job, and connect you with the right individuals. Make sure that when hiring managers and recruiters are looking at your pages, they don’t react negatively to anything they see.

Here at JSG, we’ve seen it all. When it comes to social media & job searching, here are our biggest do’s and don’ts:

Do have an active LinkedIn account. LinkedIn is a great way to start networking, when used correctly LinkedIn can help revamp your job search and connect you with the right people.

Do find a way to showcase your talents and interests. Social media can be a great way to help yourself stand out and shine against other candidates!

Do Google yourself. It is so important for you to see what Google pulls up when you search your name. Find and take down anything embarrassing or inappropriate before an employer does.

Don’t leave your accounts public. Keep your personal accounts, and her personal life… private.

Don’t post anything that could be interpreted in a negative light, use your best judgement and avoid anything that could draw negative attention!

Don’t let your guard down once you’ve been hired.