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WFH

Tips For Starting A New Job While WFH

Starting a new job creates a lot of emotions: excitement, stress, curiosity, and anxiety. However, starting a new job while working from home (WFH) is a whole other ball game. It can be challenging to get a feel for the culture, your team dynamic, and your colleagues while starting a new job remotely. Here are a few tips for starting a new career while WFH to make you feel more comfortable with your team.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions

If you only worked for your new employer for a few weeks before COVID-19 or actually started your new job while working from home, it can be overwhelming. You may not understand company processes, procedures, and other details that you probably would learn working in the office. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or for help. It’s okay to seek the aid of your manager or a co-worker if you need clarification on something. It sounds cheesy, but there are seriously are no stupid questions when it comes to a new job!

Initiate “water cooler conversations”

A big part of building strong relationships with your co-workers is getting to know them on a more personal level. This can be a little more challenging when you don’t see each other in person every day. Thus, you have to initiate “water cooler conversations” from the comfort of your home. Reach out to your co-workers and ask them about their weekend, discuss evening plans, and other small talk. These are easy ways to make you feel more united with your new team and start building upon your working relationships.

Ask for feedback

A great way to gauge how you are doing and understand what you can do better is to ask for feedback. Reach out to your co-workers and ask for some advice to help you navigate this new job better. Your team should want to help you succeed; therefore, it shouldn’t be a problem for them to give some helpful input. Also, you can ask your manager or boss for a one-on-one to provide you with some constructive criticism. You can discuss what you are doing well and what you still need to work on. This is an excellent way to improve and show the initiative that you want to be a better employee.

Starting a new job while WFH is challenging, but these three tips should help guide you in the first few weeks of your new career journey!

Avoid WFH Burnout

How to Avoid WFH Burnout in During the Pandemic

Millions across North America have been working from home (WFH) since the middle of March. As a result, many are beginning to feel the burnout of WFH. The combination of longer workdays, more family-related responsibilities, and isolation is starting to take its toll. A recent survey by Glint revealed that responses discussing burnout doubled from March to April (from 2.7% to 5.4%). As stay at home orders linger, this feeling will continue to increase, impacting our productivity, mental health, and overall attitude towards our work.

For most of us that are lucky enough to work from home, the division between work and home is looking a little blurry. If you’re starting to feel overwhelmed while working remotely, here is how to avoid WFH burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Separation between work and home

One of the biggest challenges of working from home is the unclear division between home and work. It’s easy to feel obligated to continue working when you’re at home. With more effective communication, thanks to the soaring adoption of video technologies, it’s easy to overwork yourself. In fact, the average remote employee works an extra 1.4 more days per month than when working in the office. When WFH, you never really feel like you are ‘off’ of work, and therefore, continue to check those emails.

To mitigate this, create a physical divide between your work life and your home life. Try and set up a home office or workstation where all you do is work. It will help you eliminate distractions and be more productive. When you’re through with your work, try and leave the area for the day. Physically separating yourself from work will help avoid the WFH burnout.

Don’t forget to take breaks and get up from your computer. It can be easy to sit down and not get up for a few hours. If you struggle with this, set a timer or calendar reminder to get up every hour for a couple of minutes and stretch. You will feel a little refreshed if you take small breaks throughout the day.

Maintain a routine

Try and create a routine while working from home, just like you would if you were at the office. Wake up at the same time every day, shower, get ready, eat some breakfast, take a lunch break, etc. Creating a routine will help work, well, feel like work! Maintaining a routine will prevent you from feeling burnt out because it will feel like it’s a typical working day. It will also help you maintain a stricter work schedule, so you don’t overwork yourself. Whatever your routine looks like, stick with it, and it will help create further separation for your work life and your home life.

Block out some ‘me time’

It’s critical to take some personal time during these uncertain circumstances. Most of us have a lot of additional stressors and anxiety right now – finances, feeling contained, balancing work and family responsibilities, and possibly even acting as a teacher for your kids who’re finishing up the school year online. That’s a lot to take on, and it can be challenging to have some “me time.” Block out some personal time each day, even if it’s just an hour, to relax and decompress from all your responsibilities. Turn your phone off, read a book, go for a walk, watch some Netflix, or whatever it is you need to do to unwind.

If you are really feeling overwhelmed, consider taking a day off work. 31% of employees have taken a day off from work for their mental health. If you can do this, you will come back feeling refreshed and able to concentrate on your job better.